Ebook for Transkids
January 23, 2013
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January 27, 2013

“So, what was Stonewall?”

In the wake of the President’s historic speech referencing Stonewall, NPR ran a piece asking and purporting to answer the question, “So, what was Stonewall?” The article calls upon Martin Duberman, now 82, to retell the story of Stonewall. Martin Duberman published the first history of Stonewall in 1993. His history significantly featured trans folk. Bizarrely, the NPR author Liz Halloran seems to rewrite Duberman’s history, spending many lines minimizing the trans aspect of Stonewall:

 “I liked the mix of people,” he said. “It was not filled, as some accounts have it, with drag queens and street hustlers — it was a nice mix of young and middle-aged, prosperous and not prosperous.”

Bouncers at the door screened patrons, but they couldn’t keep out police, who with some frequency would “raid” the bar, roust the patrons, and perhaps charge them with infractions ranging from loitering to specific regulations that at the time targeted gay men.

“They were using any excuse,” Duberman said. “For example, you had to be wearing at least four pieces of ‘gender-appropriate’ garb.”

The night of June 28, 1969, was different.

When police raided the bar, and pushed customers outside, Duberman said, the men began to throw things back at the police — coins, bricks; eventually, a parking meter.

This leaves you with a certain impression. Let’s look at how Halloran’s reporting of Duberman’s account differs from what Duberman himself wrote:

[Sylvia’s]  lover, Gary, had come along; Tammy, Bambi, and Ivan were there; and rumor had it that Marsha Johnson, disgusted at all the no-shows for her birthday… when the cops came barreling through the front door.

The next thing she knew, the cops, with their usual arrogance, were stomping through, ordering the patrons to line up and get their IDs ready for examination. “Oh my God!” Sylvia shouted at Gary. “I didn’t bring my ID!” Before she could panic, Gary reached in his pocket and produced her card—he had brought it along. “Praise be to Saint Barbara!” Sylvia shrieked, snatching the precious ID. If the raid went according to the usual pattern, the only people arrested would be those without IDs, those dressed in the clothes of the opposite gender, and some or all of the employees.

Sylvia tried to take it in stride; she’d been through lots worse, and with her ID in hand and nothing more than makeup on, she knew the hassling would be minimal. But she was pissed; the good high she’d had was gone, and her nerve ends felt as raw as when she had been crying over Judy earlier in the evening… She was sick of being treated like scum: “I was just not in the mood,” was how she later put it. “It had got to the point where I didn’t want to be bothered anymore.” When one of the cops grabbed the ID out of her hand and asked her with a smirk if she was a boy or a girl, she almost swung at him, but Gary grabbed her hand in time…

Some of the campier patrons, emerging one by one from the Stonewall to find an unexpected crowd, took the opportunity to strike instant poses, starlet-style, while the onlookers whistled and shouted their applause-meter ratings. But when a paddy wagon pulled up, the mood turned more somber. And it grew sullen when the police officers started to emerge from Stonewall with prisoners in tow and moved with them toward the waiting van. Jim Fouratt at the back of the crowd, Sylvia standing with Gary near the small park across the street from Stonewall, and Craig perched on top of the crowd—all sensed something unusual in the air, all felt a kind of tensed expectancy.

… a few people started to boo, and others pressed against the waiting van, while the cops standing near it yelled angrily for the crowd to move back. According to Sylvia, “you could feel the electricity going through people. You could actually feel it. People were getting really, really pissed and uptight.” A guy in a dark red T-shirt danced in and out of the crowd, shouting “Nobody’s gonna fuck with me!” and “Ain’t gonna take this shit!”

Sylvia spotted Tammy Novak among the three queens lined up for the paddy wagon, and along with others in the crowd started yelling “Tammy! Tammy!”—Sylvia’s shriek ris-ing above the rest. But Tammy apparently didn’t hear, and Sylvia guessed that she was too stoned to know what was going on. Yet when a cop shoved Tammy and told her to “Keep moving! Keep moving!” as he poked her with his club, Tammy told him to stop pushing, and when he didn’t, she started swinging. From that point on, so much happened so quickly as to seem simultaneous.

Jim Fouratt insists that the explosive moment came when “a dyke dressed in men’s clothing,” who had been visiting a male employee inside the bar, started to act up as the cops moved her toward the paddy wagon. According to Jim, “the queens were act-ing like queens, throwing their change and giving lots of attitude and lip. But the dyke had to be more butch than the queens. So when the police moved her into the wagon, she got out the other side and started to rock it.”

– Stonewall by Martin B. Duberman, 1993

Gee… Does Halloran’s reporting of Duberman’s account sound a bit different than Duberman’s own words to you?

Here’s another historical account of that night by trans history blogger Zagria:

One of the first reported actions that started the riot on the 27th, was that a cop hit a butch female/trans man and that he hit back. It has been debated whether this was Stormé DeLarveriewho was previously the sole male impersonator in the Jewel Box Revue. Deputy Inspector Pine has testified that the first significant resistance that he encountered in the bar was from the transvestites. Allyson Allante, then 14, was arrested, as was Maria Ritter who was there with her friend Kiki to celebrate Maria being 18 and legally able to drink for the first time. Street queen, Birdy Rivera was also there. Diane Kearney was in the area and for a time joined the crowd that was observing events. Tammy Novak had persuaded Sylvia Rae Rivera, then only 17, to come down to the Stonewall Inn for the first time. Tammy was arrested and put in the paddy wagon for drag queens, but escaped in the confusion and ran to Joe Tish’s apartment where she holed up for the weekend. A police officer putting Maria Ritter into the paddy wagon had commented that he couldn’t believe that she was a boy. She said that she wasn’t. As some more trans women were directed in, Maria stepped around them and walked away. The same policeman went to intercept her, but as she broke into tears, waved her to go away. Marsha P. Johnson and Zazu Nova were also active in the riots, andMichelleDario Modon and Christine Hayworth were present. Marsha was observed dropping a heavy weight onto a police car. Wayne County (who would later become Jayne) met Miss Peaches and Marsha P Johnson on arrival and realized what was going on.  He joined an impromptu march up and down Christopher Street shouting “Gay Power!”.


stonewall2

One of the most famous stonewall photos has Michelle Parkerson – popular Jewel Box drag queen and genderqueer (3rd from left) – in it.

It’s a shame that some cisgender historians feel a need to excise trans folks from queer history. But, this isn’t the first time the Stonewall movement has been retold as being the Ciswall movement:

A strange new myth has arisen about the origins of the gay movement. This myth, fervently endorsed by some trans activists, holds that the gay and lesbian movement was, essentially and pivotally, the work of their group, the transgender people. The transgender folk were in the vanguard, gay men and lesbians followed meekly after. This bizarre claim in the opposite of the truth.

First of all, the term “transgender” is an anachronism, and as such revealing of the present-minded agenda of those who brandish it. To be sure, Christine Jorgensen had made headlines with her Danish surgery in 1953. Jorgensen, and the very few individuals who followed her example at the time, had little interest in gay matters, because they believed that they had truly become women. Jorgensen dated men and regarded herself as heterosexual. The same was true of Reed (formerly Rita) Erickson, a wealthy oil tycoon who helped fund several social-change organizations.

Let us then be honest. If we are to speak of a “transgender” contribution we must restrict ourselves to drag queens. They were the only transgender folks around in those days. None of them in fact made a major contribution to the movement.

– Author of the Encyclopedia of Homosexuality, Wayne Dynes, 12/16/2009

[pullquote align=”right”]The deniers did not get the 1969 call from Dick Liesch of NYC Mattachine that I did, “You will not believe this but the drag queens and street dykes are rioting in the streets of the Village.” To which I replied, “You are right, I do not believe that.” but fortunately for us all it was true… – Ray Hill[/pullquote]Here, the cisgender author of the Encyclopedia of Homosexuality makes a number of incredibly cis-bias assertions:

  • “Transgender” didn’t exist at the time of Stonewall. This is factually wrong. The term did exist, but was not widely used at the time of Stonewall.
  • Since “transgender” supposedly wasn’t yet coined, there was no trans community. In fact, this community was generally referred to a the “TV/TS community” or we were simply called “queens” (sometimes we were all just called ‘transvestites’) and more generically, “gay.”  The Queens Liberation Front was formed in 1969 by trans folk and it was the QLF who did the post-Stonewall legal maneuvering that led to some measure of post-Stonewall equality for the gay community (though, we trans folk fell on our swords to make this happen for people like Dynes).
  • The drag community is not part of the trans community, and besides… drag queens were irrelevant to the equality movement. This flippant dismissal is probably most irksome to me. It’s like saying, “You weren’t important… And if it’s ever found that something you did was important, it wasn’t majorly important.” The fact is that trans folk were, at the very least, part of the group that instigated the Stonewall riot and trans folk payed for the legal battles that followed Stonewall. On top of that trans folk payed for and organized the national queer meetings prior to Stonewall in addition to bankrolling the Mattachine Society with money raised at trans events. Dynes dismissively refers to Reed Erickson (using his pre-transition name to boot!) as if the fact that Erickson funded practically all significant queer research before, during and after the Stonewall-era was just a minor footnote to queer history!

There are some who, unfortunately, try to ensure that trans heroes are erased from GLBT history. Instead of being regarded as being the tip of the spear – or, at the very least, an equal partner – the narrative becomes that trans folk have been riding on the coat tails of the gay community. Though NPR just helped perpetuate that narrative, they weren’t the first to try to erase trans folk from the face of Stonewall:

Women in the GLF were uncomfortable referring to Rivera—who insisted in using women’s bathrooms, even in City hall—as “she.” Pressure mounted. The year 1973 witnessed clash that would take Rivera out of the movement for the next two decades. Her lifelong friend and fellow Stonewall Veteran Bob Kohler recalled, “Sylvia left the movement because after the first three or four years, she was denied a right to speak.” It was during the Pride rally in Washington Square Park after the Christopher Street Liberation Day March.

To the dismay of Lesbian Feminist Liberation drag queens were scheduled to perform. As they passed out flyers outlining their opposition to the “female impersonators,” Rivera wrestled for the microphone held by emcee Vitto Russo, before getting hit with it herself. Rivera explained, “I had to battle my way up on stage, and literally get beaten up and punched around by people I thought were my comrades, to get to that microphone. I got to the microphone and I said my piece.” Rivera complained that the middle-class crowd cared little to nothing about the continued harassment and arrests of street drag queens. Bleeding, Rivera sang, “You Gotta Have Friends,” screamed “Revolution Now!” and led the crowd in a chant of “Give me a G, Give me an A, Give me a Y…What does it spell?” Barely audible, her voice breaking, “GAY POWER,” she groaned.

– Benjamin Shepard, “Sylvia and Sylvia’s Children: The Battle for a Queer Public Space,” That’s Revolting! (ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore)

After the above events occurred, anti-trans RadFems took to the stage:

O’Leary took in the unruly audience as she walked to the front of the open stage. Some men were hissing and booing, drag queens were cursing at her, and she could see men and women jostling each other in the park. Russo, [the event MC] a slight and soft-spoken man, pleaded for calm, his voice quavering: “Listen to her!” he said. “You’ve listened to everyone else. That’s the least we can do for her.” The crowd quieted. O’Leary recounted how the Lesbian Feminist Liberation had negotiated for ten days for a chance to speak. “Because one person, a man, Sylvia, gets up here and causes a ruckus,” O’Leary noted, the lesbians had finally won their spot. “I think that says something,” she said. She proceeded to read the statement, attacking men who “impersonate women for reasons of entertainment and profit,” saying they “insult women.” There were more hisses and shouts from the audience.

Any hope that giving a moment to Jean O’Leary and Sylvia Rivera would end this squall disappeared the moment Lee Brewster took the stage. He, too, was in full drag, with thick eye makeup, a lush blond wig tumbling over his shoulders and a queen’s crown resting on the wig. “I cannot sit and let my people be insulted,” Brewster said. “They’ve accused me of reminding you too many times that today you’re celebrating what was the result of what the drag queens did at the Stonewall. You go to bars because of what drag queens did for you, and these bitches”—he gestured to the lesbians—”tell us to quit being ourselves.” Vito Russo walked over to Brewster, slipped his arm around Brewster’s waist and whispered into his ear, but Brewster pushed him off.

“Gay liberation,” Brewster declared, “screw you! I’m going into my closet!” With that, the queen cast his crown into the audience, which by this point was in near-brawl.

– Out For Good: The Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement in America, 2001, pp 171 – 172

Now mind you, this happened in 1973. By 1973, trans folk had been fighting the LGBT’s legal battle in the courts for more than 3 years!

After a three-and-a-half-year battle, a bill to ban discrimination against homosexuals in employment, housing, and public accommodations was voted out of New York’s City Council’s General Welfare Committee.

The measure won approval of seven of the eight committee members on hand after an amendment was approved relating to transvestites. This was the fifth attempt to get the bill out of committee. The amendment stated that nothing in the definition of sexual orientation “shall be construed to bear upon the standards of attire or dress code.” The amendment was key to committee passage and the wording had been worked out carefully by Theodor S. Weiss and Carter Burden.

Bebe Scarpie, Director of Queens Liberation Front, met at City Hall with the sponsors and QLF’s attorney, Richard Levidow, a week prior to the voting on the bill. Ms. Scarpie and attorney Levidow submitted to the above wording as an alternative to getting the bill passed. The clause, according to Mr. Levidow is unconstitutional and won’t hold up in court because of the “equal rights” protection of the US Constitution. “QLF gave in on being included in this piece of legislation because politicians were using the transvestite as a ‘scapegoat’ for not passing the bill,” says Lee Brewster, former director and founder of QLF.

Queens Liberation Front won’t issue a formal statement on the bill until it is either passed or defeated, which looks possible as we go to press.

– Drag Magazine, 1973

And thus did the trans community fall on its own sword so that the gay community could enjoy a little equality. And so began a long and painful tradition of the cisgender GLB community throwing trans folk (of any and all stripes) under the bus, year after painful year.

The above clip is of Ray Hill* talking about the 1979 March on Washington (MOW). Hill had attended the national meetings organized by the NY trans community. These trans-organized national meetings facilitated the birth of the national queer movement that led to the 1979 MOW. Even so, trans folk continued to feel swept aside by their cis brothers and sisters. Hill is referring to this growing sentiment in the above recording.

Hill: Of the 18 people including Rita, David and I that went to the North American Conference of Homophile Organizations in 19 and 68, David and I, and two others survive. That was the national leadership.

Cristan Williams: Whenever that took place – I know the terms have changed over the years – but, was there anyone who might be…

Hill: … Considered now trans? Yeah! Sure!

– Interview with Ray Hill, Transgender Archive, Houston, Texas

Trans folk, whether you like it or not, have been a significant part of LGBT equality from the get-go. This transphobic cis-washing of queer history has to end. The self-directed communal shame is, at this point, just sad and it must to stop.

Crossposted from Ehipassiko

*NOTE: Ray Hill is an early LGBT right national activist from Houston, Texas and was the lead organizer for the 1979 MOW. The Pacifica Radio Archive has a recording of Hill and Harvey Milk discussing plans for the MOW. The recording in this post was made at the 15th Annual (2007) Transgender Unity Banquet in Houston, Texas.

Note the definition of “GAY” in the official 1979 MOW Program:

Official Souvenir Program of the 1979 National March on Washington, Page 40

See also: Interview with an actual Stonewall Riot veteran: the ciswashing of Stonewall must end!

Cristan Williams
Cristan Williams
Cristan Williams is a trans historian and pioneer in addressing the practical needs of the transgender community. She started the first trans homeless shelter in the South and co-founded the first federally funded trans-only homeless program, pioneered affordable healthcare for trans people in the Houston area, won the right for trans people to change their gender on Texas ID prior to surgery, started numerous trans social service programs and founded the Transgender Center as well as the Transgender Archives. Cristan is the editor at the social justice sites TransAdvocate.com and TheTERFs.com, is a long-term member and previous chair of the City of Houston HIV Prevention Planning Group.

58 Comments

  1. maria says:

    Hi! does any one have any info on the bartender at stonewall Maggie Jiggs ? she Worked at the bar in 1969? Ive traying to find her story, pictures anything!!! thanks

  2. I have been so upset about this transphobic and deeply offensive petition to get organizations and media outlets to divorce the “T” from LGBT (no word about QIA in LGBTQIA). Zach Ford at Think Progress has put together a comprehensive look at the anti-transgender petition, who’s behind it, and why it’s wrong. Here’s the complete report:
    CREDIT: AP PHOTO/RICHARD DREW
    The rejection and erasure of transgender people tracks back decades to the riots that took place at The Stonewall Inn, now a national historic landmark.

    A new Change.org petition seeks to capitalize on the defeat of Houston’s Equal Rights Ordinance — spurred by fearmongering about transgender women — by driving a new wedge between people who identify as gay, lesbian, and bisexual and those who identify as transgender. The petition calls on the top LGBT rights organizations to “Drop the T,” i.e. abandon support for transgender rights entirely.

    The historic contributions of gay white men are being erased.
    Bemoaning the backlash over the film Stonewall, the petition creator argues that the transgender movement is “attempting to re-cast the majority gay white men who participated in the Stonewall riots as transgender.”
    The creator — identified by the pseudonym “Clayton” — expounded on this point in his interview with The Federalist, emphasizing that “the handful of drag queens who were present at the riots were not transgender as we know them today — straight men who have transitioned to presenting as women.” The statement emphasizes how little how the petitioner understands transgender people and their sexualities. In the 2011 National Transgender Discrimination Survey, only 23 percent of transgender people identified themselves as heterosexual, with equal proportions identifying as gay/lesbian/same-gender-loving (23 percent), bisexual (25 percent), or otherwise queer (23 percent).
    Clayton also misrepresents history to try to reject transgender identities. Historical context actually showsthat many of the gender-nonconforming “queens” and “tranvestites” were very much “transgender” as understood by the term today, even if the way they identified themselves at the time didn’t match up perfectly to today’s vocabulary and standards. There’s been no shortage of attempts to erase the roles trans women of color — like Sylvia River, Marsha P. Johnson, and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy — played in the riots and the activism that followed. That’s not to say that there weren’t gay white men there too, but this clear attempt at erasure follows a long tradition all the way back to the post-Stonewall rallies where Rivera had to fight her way to the stage to speak. A portrait of Rivera was added to the National Portrait Gallery last month, bringing new visibilityto her efforts.
    Children should not be encouraged to transition.
    The petition describes its “most troubling” concern as the notion that children will be incorrectly diagnosed with “gender dysphoria” when they’re likely grow out of it. Specifically, it claims there is “considerable research that shows that more than 90 percent of children who express “gender dysphoria” at a young age grow out of it by adolescence.” In his interview, Clayton similarly refers to “the transitioning of young children who likely are just gay/lesbian/bisexual kids” as a “harm” caused by transgender rights.
    The studies that lead to such conclusions actually prove the opposite. That’s because they analyzed samples of children who exhibited any gender nonconforming behavior, not just those who actually identified themselves as a different gender. Thus, the “90 percent of youth” who grew up to be not transgender largely represents a group that never claimed to be transgenderin the first place.
    Clayton is right in his interview comment that not all “sissies” and “tomboys” grow up to be trans, but that’s irrelevant. The young people who actually know that their gender is different are very much trans. They identify with their gender identity as completely as their cisgender peers, allowing them to transition is good for their mental health, and there are no known health consequences to treatments like delaying puberty with hormone suppression.
    Clayton and his fellow petitioners would reject these young people’s experiences and prevent them from getting the support and treatment they deserve.
    Trans equality and LGB equality are in conflict.
    The petition ends by asserting that “transgender ideology is not compatible with the rights of women, gay men and children.” Clayton further explained in the interview that because LGB people don’t have to change their bodies “to help us become whom we believe we are,” their identities are too different from trans people’s experiences.
    In a revealing statement, he also admitted that part of his motive is throwing transgender people under the bus to advance LGB rights without them, something that has happened all too often in the history of the LGBT movement. “The problem that develops when we are all under the same umbrella,” he said “is that so many of our enemies see us as one and the same.”
    “Our communities,” he concluded “linked together in such a slender fashion, no longer have a common ground, if we ever did in the first place.”
    But as the LGBT groups’ responses all point out, what unites the experiences of LGBT people is that anti-LGB and anti-T stigma all have the same source. “The hate that killed Matthew Shepard killed Zella Ziona,” HRC wrote, referring to Ziona, a black trans woman who just last month was fatally shot in a suspected hate crime. It is gender nonconformity that makes all LGBT people vulnerable to scorn, prejudice, discrimination, and violence. Clayton and his fellow petitioners only reinforce gender policing by suggesting that some ways of doing gender are right and others are not.
    Despite being flagged by numerous users as being hate speech, Change.org has not taken the petition down. The platform has long been criticized for hosting petitions that reject LGBT rights, but has previously told ThinkProgress that it has only a small team capable of responding to flags, and the company takes “suppressing the voice of any one of our users extremely seriously.”
    ThinkProgress reached out to for comment specifically about the “Drop the T” petition’s continued presence on the site. Change.org’s senior communications manager Shareeza Bhola acknowledged that multiple flags led the company to “closely review” the petition. “We immediately removed a sentence that violated our Community Guidelines on hate speech,” she said, “and we also disabled the comment functionality based on the hate speech we were seeing there.”
    Change.org did not immediately respond to a follow-up inquiry as to what sentence was cut and why the rest of the petition was not in violation of the company’s policy against petitions that “attack or malign an entire class of people” based on characteristics such as gender identity.
    Bhola did, however, also note that a reactive petition, entitled “We stand with trans people – Reject ‘Drop the T,’” has since been created. It already has more signatures than the original.
    “In a large majority of cases, Change.org is used to advance LGBT rights,” Bhola explained.

    Read the original report here at Think Progress:http://thinkprogress.org/lgbt/2015/11/09/3720478/change-petition-transphobia-wedge/
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  3. jennburleton says:

    MetroWeekly, the online LGBTQ news and features magazine based in Washington, D.C. just posted an article with the title “Transgender Forward: A Timeline of Significant Moments in the Transgender Movement”. It features events from roughly the last 200+ years that impacted the lives of people we now consider to reside somewhere on the ‘transgender spectrum’. The timeline itself was compiled by the staff at another online magazine, San Diego LGBT Weekly.
    While it is a lovely and no doubt impressive list of people and events, it left me feeling somewhat unsatisfied. There was something missing…but what could it be? All the stars and icons were present, Christine Jorgensen, Laverne Cox, Chaz Bono, Renee Richards, Oregon’s own Stu Rasmussen, Lana Wachowski, and of course, the single most significant transgender person to ever walk the face of planet Earth, Caitlyn Jenner.
    Hmmm…seems to be pretty trans-feminine heavy. But that’s a subject for another post.
    In addition to the people, most of the known events were represented; Dewey’s Coffee Shop Protest, 1966 publication of “The Transsexual Phenomenon“, the Stonewall Riots. All absolutely important stuff! Yet…something was missing…what could it be?
    Oh yeah. Children. Adolescents. Teens. You know, ‘our most precious possessions’, though seeing them as “possessions” is a big part of the problem. But I digress.
    In a way, the exclusion of kids itself is a testament to equality. Even those dedicated to LGBTQ social justice have the human right to practice and enjoy adultist privilege by assuming the only people and events that matter are those that involve or impact other adults. It’s what I call the “transgender, gay, lesbian and queer people get to be narrow minded and self-centered  just like cisgender and straight people do” doctrine.
    Yes, the list does mention several events that involved transgender youth – but they were all unspeakable tragedies. The murders of Brandon Teena, Gwen Araujo, and passing mention of fifteen-year old Leticia King, who the article refers to only by her male birth name. Even with that, the article leaves out significant tragic events from recent history.
    Eighteen-year old Angie Zapata was murdered in Greeley, Colorado by Allen Andrade in 2008, after he discovered she was transgender. This resulted in a first-degree murder conviction for Andrade – the first time someone had been convicted of a bias-motivated hate crime against a transgender person in the United States.
    Leelah Alcorn was a seventeen-year old transgender girl who tragically took her own life near Columbus, Ohio in 2014. While she was certainly not the only child we’ve lost to suicide, her death had a major impact on raising awareness of the evils of “conversion” and “reparative” therapy and indifference to the needs of transgender youth.
    One of the primary reasons we see so much trauma experienced by and inflicted on transgender people is that adults representing every gender identity, sexual orientation, political and religious ideology and geographic location treat the needs of children and youth as afterthoughts.
    Here are just a few of the SIGNIFICANT events that have involved or impacted the lives of transgender spectrum children, adolescents, teens and their families…most of whom are cisgender and heteronormative.
    Early 20th century: gender variant patients of German sexologist Magnus Hirschfeld related their experiences of feeling like a gender other than the one reflected on their birth records or suggested by their physical anatomy SINCE CHILDHOOD.
    1948: Alfred Kinsey introduces Dr. Harry Benjamin (author of The Transsexual Phenomenon) to a transgender child who makes it very clear that they are a girl despite their male anatomy. The child is supported by their parent, and Dr. Benjamin provides them with whatever assistance he can.
    1980: Inclusion of the “Gender Identity Disorder in Childhood” diagnosis in the DSM-III, where it remained as part of the DSM-IV until 2013 and the release of DSM 5 and the more accurate diagnostic classification of “gender dysphoria”. The addition of GIDC to the literature in 1980 was seen by many as an ‘end-around’ move to appease those upset with the removal of homosexuality as a mental disorder from the DSM in 1973. GIDC gave rise to deeply damaging theories and sketchy research from people like Richard Green, Kenneth Zucker, George Rekers, Joseph Nicolosi and others.
    1990’s: Physicians, therapists and researchers in The Netherlands begin using pubertal suppression treatment in transgender adolescents to prevent development of unwanted secondary sex characteristics like voice deepening, breast growth, menstruation, facial hair, masculinization of musculature, etc. It was the first proactive rather than reactive medical approach to affirming transgender identity in youth, resulting in greatly reduced psychological and physical trauma and reduced need for corrective surgeries or treatment later.
    1998: Dr. Edgardo Menvielle, a child-adolescent psychiatrist at National Children’s Hospital in Washington, D.C.  starts a national listserv for parents of gender variant children. By 2006, it has over 200 participants.
    1999: TransFamily of Cleveland creates a Yahoo! group for parents of transgender individuals, and soon more and more parents and caregivers of transgender children and youth begin discussing their experiences, feelings of isolation and ‘being the only ones’.
    2006/May: Former transgender child and early self-advocate Jenn Burleton (sorry for the lack of humility) stumbles across the Yahoo! group and for the first time sees a group of parents not only discussing their gender diverse and transgender kids, but voicing their unconditional support for their children.
    2006/July: News story breaks about a Florida transgender child starting kindergarten in fall of that year. The parents of that child belong to the Yahoo! group mentioned above. The media response is sensationalistic and the loudest voices responding to it come from the anti-gay extremist religious and conservative right wing. There is virtual silence from national LGBT civil rights/human rights organizations.
    Jenn Burleton (again, sorry) is disturbed by the lack of significant non-Internet only support mechanisms and organizations  available to transgender children and their families because it seems remarkably unchanged from her experience as a transgender child in the 1960’s. She is inspired to suggest to the members of the Yahoo! group that an organization that would serve as a champion, advocate and education resource for transgender children, youth and their families is needed. Her idea is met with enthusiasm, and very quickly 4 parents of transgender children agree to help with establishing such an organization. They reach out to PFLAG national for support, and are received enthusiastically, thanks in great part to the help of Dave and Joan Parker and Jean-Marie Navetta. The organization goes through several iterations as it develops, incorporates as a non-profit, eventually settling on the name Trans Youth Family Allies (TYFA). Ms. Burleton, a transgender woman, becomes its inaugural Board President and Executive Director.
    2007/April: ABC “20/20” airs a Barbara Walters special in which she interviews families of transgender children. Trans Youth Family Allies plays a small part in advising the producers of that program and for the first time audiences see transgender kids and their families as real people facing real challenges.
    2007/Summer: Transgender man Aidan Key and advocate/author Stephanie Brill create the first conference directed specifically to affirming gender diverse identity in children and youth in Seattle, Washington. It’s called the Gender Odyssey Family Conference, and it is hosted (at that time) by Gender Spectrum, a non-profit based in the San Francisco Bay area. Trans Youth Family Allies founders played a consultative/early development role in the conference planning.
    2007/Summer: TYFA founder and executive director Jenn Burleton departs that organization and co-founds Portland, Oregon-based TransActive Education & Advocacy, which later changed its name to TransActive Gender Center. She is joined in this endeavor by transgender individuals Kaig Lightner and Hayley Klug. TransActive is also dedicated to serving the needs of transgender and gender diverse children, youth and their families, but seeks to expand their work to include influencing policy change through education of legislators, improving collaborative relationship and understanding of childhood transgender identity within LGB and adult T organizations. The organization also establishes a full-service counseling program that will provide integrated services to children, youth and families.
    2010: The U.S. State Department announces new policy of issuing passports to transgender individuals that reflect their current gender rather then their birth gender.
    2011: The U.S. Department of Education releases a “Dear Colleagues Letter” to every school district in the nation clarifying that transgender and gender diverse students attending public schools are protected under Federal Title IX equal opportunity and civil rights legislation. That sex discrimination includes harassment and bullying based on gender identity and expression even if that gender identity or expression does not correspond with the gender assigned at birth or the student’s physical anatomy.
    The Department of Education Office for Civil Rights and the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Rights Division begins responding to claims against school districts nationwide for transgender discrimination under Title IX.
    2013: Transgender first grade student Coy Mathis wins the right to use girl’s restroom at her Colorado elementary school.
    2014/January: Maine transgender student Nicole Maines wins the court case against her former school district for denying her access to the restroom corresponding to her gender identity consistently expressed at school. The decision came from the Maine Supreme Court after a long struggle that included opposition from extremist Christian elements. It is the highest-level court decision ever issued in support of transgender student rights, and sets a nationwide legal precedent.
    2015/January: Oregon becomes the first state to cover pubertal suppression treatment for transgender adolescents under it’s state Medicaid plan. This was accomplished as result of testimony and education provided by TransActive Gender Center staff and healthcare advisory team. Oregon also covers a broad array of transgender healthcare needs, including gender confirmation surgery, and under existing state consent laws, these procedures are available to Oregonians age 15 and older.
    2015/July: “I Am Jazz” premieres on The Learning Channel network. It is the first major television network reality show about a transgender girl and her supportive family. Coincidentally, Jazz is the same child that entered her Florida kindergarten at age 5 in 2006.
    So, yeah…they left a few things out. But then again, it’s all just kid’s stuff.
    Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…

  4. […] collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson […]

  5. […] collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson […]

  6. […] collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson […]

  7. View this image ›
    Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) after throwing the initial brick. Phillippe Bosse
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall, but unwittingly, perfectly symbolizes how the mainstream gay rights movement has actually treated trans and gender-nonconforming people ever since the fateful Stonewall Riots a lot more compared to four decades ago. We’re comrades, even “sisters,” as soon as our numbers and our willingness to put ourselves on the line for the LGBT cause are needed, however we’re additionally the initial to get hold of tossed aside to pave the method for a lot more “respectable” queer people.
    Controversy has actually dogged Stonewall since the first trailer indicated that the film, inspired by the real-life riots of 1969, would certainly be led by a fictional white gay protagonist, Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) as he navigates life in the big city while surrounded by a racially-diverse gang of femme street urchins. Stonewall proves to be much much less about the riots compared to it is about the coming-of-age of its main character, Danny, a promising young man from Indiana who’s forced to arrive in brand-new York a few months prior to he’s set to start his initial year at Columbia University.
    Danny senses that the focus of gay culture in brand-new York City is Christopher Street, so that’s where he ends up. After getting beaten by some anti-gay policemen, he finds support and friendship in Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), a young street hustler drawn to wearing shiny clothes and lipstick, that develops a fondness for Danny’s blond, wholesome good looks, as does practically everyone he meets. From this point on, the film shifts spine and forth between Danny’s brand-new truth among the gay hustlers — his friends sleep twelve to a room after turning tricks all night — and the all-American Midwestern town he left behind. Plenty of screen time is devoted to Danny’s recent history as told in flashback: Danny gets kicked from the residence as soon as his dad — who, of course, is additionally his higher school’s football coach — finds out that his son is fooling around along with none various other than, you guessed it, the hunky star quarterback, Joe (Carl Glusman).
    Danny’s stint along with the gay and gender non-conforming sex workers of the Village adds interspersed color and spice to his foregrounded white-bread Americana upbringing, of which we see plenty — the impending Stonewall riots, and the street youngsters that will certainly start them, are merely window dressing to Danny’s storyline of self-acceptance, fairly compared to the focus of the story in their own right.
    Eventually, Danny and Ray discover themselves at the Stonewall Inn where they meet Trevor (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a member of the Mattachine Society, a gay rights group that advocated for modification through “respectable” means. as soon as Danny attends a meeting, after which Trevor conveys his belief that it’s in fulfills fairly compared to dresses that the gay rights struggle will certainly be won. Danny defends Ray and his femme friends: “It takes a lot a lot more balls to wear a dress compared to a fucking fulfill and tie.” Then Danny sleeps along with Trevor anyway, and ends up living along with your man for awhile, until Trevor finds an additional young waif and Danny feels betrayed.
    Of the femme friends Danny defends, a few are based on actual people that were at the Stonewall riots. Marsha P. Johnson (Otoja Abit) is present, a black trans leader that later co-founded the trans rights organization Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR). Ray is a composite of several figures, one of whom is the various other STAR founder Sylvia Rivera, a Latina trans activist that was section of the riots, however was eventually kicked from the gay movement she helped incite. Johnson is at finest a tangential section of the movie’s narrative, a symbol for the “extreme” faction of the gay community. As Trevor explains to Danny, the police “only arrest the trannies” as soon as raiding Stonewall – Marsha is that lone figure that gets to stand for the “tranny” faction (though Cong, an additional member of Danny and Ray’s gang, is female-presenting part-time). Marsha represents the film’s token nod to trans women, while additionally providing one-dimensional comic relief: she pops up to be fabulous and trot out one-liners, including one the real Johnson had actually said: the P. in her middle name stands for “Pay It No Mind.”

    Even if gender-nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the method trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.

    Ray is an odder case. He appears to flit spine and forth between genders, occasionally called Ramona by friends, though Danny insists on using his male name. After Marsha’s initial appearance, as soon as she greets Ray and his friends, Ray says, “Marsha’s the only drag queen that’s nice to us” — implying that he is a feminine gay man and Marsha is the Other. however as soon as Marsha later gets arrested during a raid at the Stonewall because she presents as female — violating the New York penal code that, in 1969, needed people to wear at least three articles of clothing “appropriate” to their gender — Ray gets arrested along along with her. It’s an indication of how the movie desires Ray to be merely gender-nonconforming enough so that he at least has actually some partnership to historical reality, however not so gender-variant that he couldn’t be claimed as a cisgender gay person. Marking your man as fully trans would certainly undermine the popular ideology that portrays the riots as led by “gay” people. Even if gender nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the method trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    While people protested the trailer because Danny is depicted as throwing the initial brick to incite the riots, that scene is actually one of the much less cringe-inducing minutes in Stonewall. Danny’s brick-throwing was clearly done along with the support and collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie additionally keeps along with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s initial agitator. And despite the fact that Marsha Johnson herself has actually been credited by some as the initial brick-thrower, the naked truth of that actually did it has actually been lost in history — though the chances that it was a strapping white guy from Indiana are very slim.
    It would certainly have actually been nice if male-assigned feminine people could have actually played an more prominent role in Stonewall, especially since they are presented as so debased that they do not deserve to be loved. Ray, the gender-nonconforming Latino, has actually little agency in the film beyond striving for Danny’s affection, in the tired trope of male-assigned femme serving as ultimate victim that can easily only potentially be saved by the love and protection of a good man (harkening spine to films like The Crying Game and Dallas Buyers Club). When, after the riots, Danny tells Ray he can’t possibly return his love, he consoles your man by saying, “You’ll always be my sister.” Then Danny proceeds to leave Christopher Street behind for a presumably much higher quality of life at Columbia — only coming spine to his old haunt a year later as soon as there’s a gay parade.
    Ray and the gang seem happy to see your man upon his return, despite the fact that Ray accused Danny of “merely slumming it” for the sake of a “funny story” as soon as he once lived among the hustlers. There’s no sign that Ray or his street friends are in any much better condition compared to as soon as Danny met them, though at least Danny has actually learned from his experience and grown to be a much better person, as cis white people tend to do after spending time along with the downtrodden.

    The film creates a hierarchy — the a lot more masculine you are, the a lot more lovable you are, and so much the much better if you’re white.

    Even though, as soon as rejecting Ray after the riots, Danny says “I’m too mad to love anyone right now,” he goes spine to Indiana in the fairly next scene and professes his love for the white closeted football gamer Joe, that had refused to support your man as soon as he’d been thrown from the house. Joe once again rejects him, because he has actually a wife and youngster on the way.
    Joe is nothing however a classic gay porn fantasy: the quarterback of the football team; a guy so masculine that no one can easily tell he’s gay; a guy who’s happy to get hold of a blowjob however would certainly never demean themselves by reciprocating. as soon as he and Danny had originally gotten caught fooling around together, Joe told Danny’s father that Danny seduced your man and got your man drunk, so he didn’t even know exactly what was happening. And yet by the end of the movie, Joe is still the ultimate figure of Danny’s desire, the misunderstood guy he continues to love despite the naked truth that he has actually no redeeming qualities except for being hot (if you’re in to hyper-masculine, unexpressive, closeted white gay men).
    The film thus creates a hierarchy of masculinity for those that are assigned male — the a lot more masculine you are, the a lot more lovable you are, and so much the much better if you’re white. Joe, the “straight” guy that experiments, comes first; then comes Trevor, the straight-laced respectable activist; then we have actually Ray, the guy that puts on lipstick however doesn’t fully identify as a woman, so he can easily at least dream of being along with Danny. Finally, there’s Marsha P. Johnson, who’s portrayed as an accessory that can’t dream of being loved, whose physique is only available for sex work. This doesn’t even account for the naked truth that lesbians are barely present in the movie — there’s only one butch dyke along with a few lines, and during the riots, exactly what appears to be a single lesbian couple kissing in a sea of men. These hierarchies additionally correspond along with access to political rights and social acceptance through the years, hierarchies that trans and gender-nonconforming people are constantly fighting against, and that the mainstream gay rights movement has actually historically upheld at our expense.
    Stonewall ends appropriately, along with tributes to real-life people that were portrayed in the film. Then there’s a black and white picture of the half-fictional gang headed by Danny, along with a caption that reads: “This movie is dedicated to the unsung heroes of the Stonewall Riots.” The filmmakers had the opportunity to recognize and provide agency to those unsung heroes — Johnson, Rivera, and the full spectrum of gay, trans, and gender-nonconforming people that fought for queer liberation that night — however instead, they chose to minimize trans contributions to spotlight the (made up) cute white twink from the Midwest.
    If the gay rights movement prefers to come of age like Danny, then it need to additionally recognize the ways in which queer respectability has actually been won on the backs of trans and gender-nonconforming people that go on to struggle. Stonewall can easily be the start of a conversation about what’s wrong along with how the gay rights movement — and even its well-meaning members — has actually represented its trans siblings. Gay people that now discover themselves along with a measure of power need to listen and learn, prior to they go on to make movies that trample on our history.Check out a lot more articles on BuzzFeed.com!
    Meredith Talusan is an LGBT Staff Writer for BuzzFeed News and is based in brand-new York.

  8. The New “Stonewall” Film Tramples On Trans History

    September 19, 2015 Film, History, Tramples, Trans, “Stonewall”

    Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) after throwing the first brick.
    Phillippe Bosse
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall, however unwittingly, perfectly symbolizes how the mainstream gay rights movement has treated trans and gender-nonconforming people ever since the fateful Stonewall Riots more than four decades ago. We’re comrades, even “sisters,” when our numbers and our willingness to put ourselves on the line for the LGBT cause are needed, but we’re also the first to get tossed aside to pave the way for more “respectable” queer people.
    Controversy has dogged Stonewall since the first trailer indicated that the film, inspired by the real-life riots of 1969, would be led by a fictional white gay protagonist, Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) as he navigates life in the big city while surrounded by a racially-diverse gang of femme street urchins. Stonewall proves to be much less about the riots than it is about the coming-of-age of its main character, Danny, a promising young man from Indiana who’s forced to arrive in New York a few months before he’s set to start his first year at Columbia University.
    Danny senses that the center of gay culture in New York City is Christopher Street, so that’s where he ends up. After getting beaten by some anti-gay policemen, he finds support and friendship in Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), a young street hustler drawn to wearing shiny clothes and lipstick, who develops a fondness for Danny’s blond, wholesome good looks, as does practically everyone he meets. From this point on, the film shifts back and forth between Danny’s new reality among the gay hustlers — his friends sleep twelve to a room after turning tricks all night — and the all-American Midwestern town he left behind. Plenty of screen time is devoted to Danny’s recent history as told in flashback: Danny gets kicked out of the house when his dad — who, of course, is also his high school’s football coach — finds out that his son is fooling around with none other than, you guessed it, the hunky star quarterback, Joe (Carl Glusman).
    Danny’s stint with the gay and gender non-conforming sex workers of the Village adds interspersed color and spice to his foregrounded white-bread Americana upbringing, of which we see plenty — the impending Stonewall riots, and the street kids who will start them, are merely window dressing to Danny’s storyline of self-acceptance, rather than the center of the story in their own right.

    Danny, Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), and Cong (Vladimir Alexis).
    Philippe Bosse
    Eventually, Danny and Ray find themselves at the Stonewall Inn where they meet Trevor (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a member of the Mattachine Society, a gay rights group that advocated for change through “respectable” means. When Danny attends a meeting, after which Trevor conveys his belief that it’s in suits rather than dresses that the gay rights struggle will be won. Danny defends Ray and his femme friends: “It takes a lot more balls to wear a dress than a fucking suit and tie.” Then Danny sleeps with Trevor anyway, and ends up living with him for awhile, until Trevor finds another young waif and Danny feels betrayed.
    Of the femme friends Danny defends, a few are based on actual people who were at the Stonewall riots. Marsha P. Johnson (Otoja Abit) is present, a black trans leader who later co-founded the trans rights organization Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR). Ray is a composite of several figures, one of whom is the other STAR founder Sylvia Rivera, a Latina trans activist who was part of the riots, but was eventually kicked out of the gay movement she helped incite. Johnson is at best a tangential part of the movie’s narrative, a symbol for the “extreme” faction of the gay community. As Trevor explains to Danny, the police “only arrest the trannies” when raiding Stonewall – Marsha is that lone figure who gets to stand for the “tranny” faction (though Cong, another member of Danny and Ray’s gang, is female-presenting part-time). Marsha represents the film’s token nod to trans women, while also providing one-dimensional comic relief: she pops up to be fabulous and trot out one-liners, including one the real Johnson had actually said: the P. in her middle name stands for “Pay It No Mind.”
    Even if gender-nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    Ray is an odder case. He seems to flit back and forth between genders, occasionally called Ramona by friends, though Danny insists on using his male name. After Marsha’s first appearance, when she greets Ray and his friends, Ray says, “Marsha’s the only drag queen that’s nice to us” — implying that he is a feminine gay man and Marsha is the Other. But when Marsha later gets arrested during a raid at the Stonewall because she presents as female — violating the New York penal code that, in 1969, required people to wear at least three articles of clothing “appropriate” to their gender — Ray gets arrested along with her. It’s an indication of how the movie wants Ray to be just gender-nonconforming enough so that he at least has some relationship to historical reality, but not so gender-variant that he couldn’t be claimed as a cisgender gay person. Marking him as fully trans would undermine the popular ideology that portrays the riots as led by “gay” people. Even if gender nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    While people protested the trailer because Danny is depicted as throwing the first brick to incite the riots, that scene is actually one of the less cringe-inducing moments in Stonewall. Danny’s brick-throwing was clearly done with the support and collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson herself has been credited by some as the first brick-thrower, the truth of who actually did it has been lost in history — though the chances that it was a strapping white guy from Indiana are pretty slim.
    It would have been nice if male-assigned feminine people could have played an even more prominent role in Stonewall, especially since they are presented as so debased that they do not deserve to be loved. Ray, the gender-nonconforming Latino, has little agency in the film beyond striving for Danny’s affection, in the tired trope of male-assigned femme serving as ultimate victim who can only potentially be saved by the love and protection of a good man (harkening back to films like The Crying Game and Dallas Buyers Club). When, after the riots, Danny tells Ray he can’t possibly return his love, he consoles him by saying, “You’ll always be my sister.” Then Danny proceeds to leave Christopher Street behind for a presumably much higher quality of life at Columbia — only coming back to his old haunt a year later when there’s a gay parade.
    Ray and the gang seem happy to see him upon his return, even though Ray accused Danny of “just slumming it” for the sake of a “funny story” when he once lived among the hustlers. There’s no sign that Ray or his street friends are in any better condition than when Danny met them, though at least Danny has learned from his experience and grown to be a better person, as cis white people tend to do after spending time with the downtrodden.
    The film creates a hierarchy — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white.
    Even though, when rejecting Ray after the riots, Danny says “I’m too mad to love anyone right now,” he goes back to Indiana in the very next scene and professes his love for the white closeted football player Joe, who had refused to support him when he’d been thrown out of the house. Joe once again rejects him, because he has a wife and kid on the way.
    Joe is nothing but a classic gay porn fantasy: the quarterback of the football team; a guy so masculine that no one can tell he’s gay; a guy who’s happy to get a blowjob but would never demean himself by reciprocating. When he and Danny had originally gotten caught fooling around together, Joe told Danny’s father that Danny seduced him and got him drunk, so he didn’t even know what was happening. And yet by the end of the movie, Joe is still the ultimate figure of Danny’s desire, the misunderstood guy he continues to love despite the fact that he has no redeeming qualities except for being hot (if you’re into hyper-masculine, unexpressive, closeted white gay men).
    The film thus creates a hierarchy of masculinity for those who are assigned male — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white. Joe, the “straight” guy who experiments, comes first; then comes Trevor, the straight-laced respectable activist; then we have Ray, the guy who puts on lipstick but doesn’t fully identify as a woman, so he can at least dream of being with Danny. Finally, there’s Marsha P. Johnson, who’s portrayed as an accessory who can’t dream of being loved, whose body is only available for sex work. This doesn’t even account for the fact that lesbians are barely present in the movie — there’s only one butch dyke with a few lines, and during the riots, what appears to be a single lesbian couple kissing in a sea of men. These hierarchies also correspond with access to political rights and social acceptance through the years, hierarchies that trans and gender-nonconforming people are constantly fighting against, and that the mainstream gay rights movement has historically upheld at our expense.
    Stonewall ends appropriately, with tributes to real-life people who were portrayed in the film. Then there’s a black and white picture of the half-fictional gang headed by Danny, with a caption that reads: “This movie is dedicated to the unsung heroes of the Stonewall Riots.” The filmmakers had the opportunity to recognize and give agency to those unsung heroes — Johnson, Rivera, and the full spectrum of gay, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who fought for queer liberation that night — but instead, they chose to minimize trans contributions to spotlight the (made up) cute white twink from the Midwest.
    If the gay rights movement wishes to come of age like Danny, then it must also recognize the ways in which queer respectability has been won on the backs of trans and gender-nonconforming people who continue to struggle. Stonewall can be the start of a conversation about what’s wrong with how the gay rights movement — and even its well-meaning members — has represented its trans siblings. Gay people who now find themselves with a measure of power need to listen and learn, before they continue to make movies that trample on our history.

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  9. By Meredith Talusan

    Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) after throwing the first brick.
    Phillippe Bosse
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall, however unwittingly, perfectly symbolizes how the mainstream gay rights movement has treated trans and gender-nonconforming people ever since the fateful Stonewall Riots more than four decades ago. We’re comrades, even “sisters,” when our numbers and our willingness to put ourselves on the line for the LGBT cause are needed, but we’re also the first to get tossed aside to pave the way for more “respectable” queer people.
    Controversy has dogged Stonewall since the first trailer indicated that the film, inspired by the real-life riots of 1969, would be led by a fictional white gay protagonist, Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) as he navigates life in the big city while surrounded by a racially-diverse gang of femme street urchins. Stonewall proves to be much less about the riots than it is about the coming-of-age of its main character, Danny, a promising young man from Indiana who’s forced to arrive in New York a few months before he’s set to start his first year at Columbia University.
    Danny senses that the center of gay culture in New York City is Christopher Street, so that’s where he ends up. After getting beaten by some anti-gay policemen, he finds support and friendship in Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), a young street hustler drawn to wearing shiny clothes and lipstick, who develops a fondness for Danny’s blond, wholesome good looks, as does practically everyone he meets. From this point on, the film shifts back and forth between Danny’s new reality among the gay hustlers — his friends sleep twelve to a room after turning tricks all night — and the all-American Midwestern town he left behind. Plenty of screen time is devoted to Danny’s recent history as told in flashback: Danny gets kicked out of the house when his dad — who, of course, is also his high school’s football coach — finds out that his son is fooling around with none other than, you guessed it, the hunky star quarterback, Joe (Carl Glusman).
    Danny’s stint with the gay and gender non-conforming sex workers of the Village adds interspersed color and spice to his foregrounded white-bread Americana upbringing, of which we see plenty — the impending Stonewall riots, and the street kids who will start them, are merely window dressing to Danny’s storyline of self-acceptance, rather than the center of the story in their own right.

    Danny, Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), and Cong (Vladimir Alexis).
    Philippe Bosse
    Eventually, Danny and Ray find themselves at the Stonewall Inn where they meet Trevor (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a member of the Mattachine Society, a gay rights group that advocated for change through “respectable” means. When Danny attends a meeting, after which Trevor conveys his belief that it’s in suits rather than dresses that the gay rights struggle will be won. Danny defends Ray and his femme friends: “It takes a lot more balls to wear a dress than a fucking suit and tie.” Then Danny sleeps with Trevor anyway, and ends up living with him for awhile, until Trevor finds another young waif and Danny feels betrayed.
    Of the femme friends Danny defends, a few are based on actual people who were at the Stonewall riots. Marsha P. Johnson (Otoja Abit) is present, a black trans leader who later co-founded the trans rights organization Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR). Ray is a composite of several figures, one of whom is the other STAR founder Sylvia Rivera, a Latina trans activist who was part of the riots, but was eventually kicked out of the gay movement she helped incite. Johnson is at best a tangential part of the movie’s narrative, a symbol for the “extreme” faction of the gay community. As Trevor explains to Danny, the police “only arrest the trannies” when raiding Stonewall – Marsha is that lone figure who gets to stand for the “tranny” faction (though Cong, another member of Danny and Ray’s gang, is female-presenting part-time). Marsha represents the film’s token nod to trans women, while also providing one-dimensional comic relief: she pops up to be fabulous and trot out one-liners, including one the real Johnson had actually said: the P. in her middle name stands for “Pay It No Mind.”
    Even if gender-nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    Ray is an odder case. He seems to flit back and forth between genders, occasionally called Ramona by friends, though Danny insists on using his male name. After Marsha’s first appearance, when she greets Ray and his friends, Ray says, “Marsha’s the only drag queen that’s nice to us” — implying that he is a feminine gay man and Marsha is the Other. But when Marsha later gets arrested during a raid at the Stonewall because she presents as female — violating the New York penal code that, in 1969, required people to wear at least three articles of clothing “appropriate” to their gender — Ray gets arrested along with her. It’s an indication of how the movie wants Ray to be just gender-nonconforming enough so that he at least has some relationship to historical reality, but not so gender-variant that he couldn’t be claimed as a cisgender gay person. Marking him as fully trans would undermine the popular ideology that portrays the riots as led by “gay” people. Even if gender nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    While people protested the trailer because Danny is depicted as throwing the first brick to incite the riots, that scene is actually one of the less cringe-inducing moments in Stonewall. Danny’s brick-throwing was clearly done with the support and collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson herself has been credited by some as the first brick-thrower, the truth of who actually did it has been lost in history — though the chances that it was a strapping white guy from Indiana are pretty slim.
    It would have been nice if male-assigned feminine people could have played an even more prominent role in Stonewall, especially since they are presented as so debased that they do not deserve to be loved. Ray, the gender-nonconforming Latino, has little agency in the film beyond striving for Danny’s affection, in the tired trope of male-assigned femme serving as ultimate victim who can only potentially be saved by the love and protection of a good man (harkening back to films like The Crying Game and Dallas Buyers Club). When, after the riots, Danny tells Ray he can’t possibly return his love, he consoles him by saying, “You’ll always be my sister.” Then Danny proceeds to leave Christopher Street behind for a presumably much higher quality of life at Columbia — only coming back to his old haunt a year later when there’s a gay parade.
    Ray and the gang seem happy to see him upon his return, even though Ray accused Danny of “just slumming it” for the sake of a “funny story” when he once lived among the hustlers. There’s no sign that Ray or his street friends are in any better condition than when Danny met them, though at least Danny has learned from his experience and grown to be a better person, as cis white people tend to do after spending time with the downtrodden.
    The film creates a hierarchy — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white.
    Even though, when rejecting Ray after the riots, Danny says “I’m too mad to love anyone right now,” he goes back to Indiana in the very next scene and professes his love for the white closeted football player Joe, who had refused to support him when he’d been thrown out of the house. Joe once again rejects him, because he has a wife and kid on the way.
    Joe is nothing but a classic gay porn fantasy: the quarterback of the football team; a guy so masculine that no one can tell he’s gay; a guy who’s happy to get a blowjob but would never demean himself by reciprocating. When he and Danny had originally gotten caught fooling around together, Joe told Danny’s father that Danny seduced him and got him drunk, so he didn’t even know what was happening. And yet by the end of the movie, Joe is still the ultimate figure of Danny’s desire, the misunderstood guy he continues to love despite the fact that he has no redeeming qualities except for being hot (if you’re into hyper-masculine, unexpressive, closeted white gay men).
    The film thus creates a hierarchy of masculinity for those who are assigned male — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white. Joe, the “straight” guy who experiments, comes first; then comes Trevor, the straight-laced respectable activist; then we have Ray, the guy who puts on lipstick but doesn’t fully identify as a woman, so he can at least dream of being with Danny. Finally, there’s Marsha P. Johnson, who’s portrayed as an accessory who can’t dream of being loved, whose body is only available for sex work. This doesn’t even account for the fact that lesbians are barely present in the movie — there’s only one butch dyke with a few lines, and during the riots, what appears to be a single lesbian couple kissing in a sea of men. These hierarchies also correspond with access to political rights and social acceptance through the years, hierarchies that trans and gender-nonconforming people are constantly fighting against, and that the mainstream gay rights movement has historically upheld at our expense.
    Stonewall ends appropriately, with tributes to real-life people who were portrayed in the film. Then there’s a black and white picture of the half-fictional gang headed by Danny, with a caption that reads: “This movie is dedicated to the unsung heroes of the Stonewall Riots.” The filmmakers had the opportunity to recognize and give agency to those unsung heroes — Johnson, Rivera, and the full spectrum of gay, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who fought for queer liberation that night — but instead, they chose to minimize trans contributions to spotlight the (made up) cute white twink from the Midwest.
    If the gay rights movement wishes to come of age like Danny, then it must also recognize the ways in which queer respectability has been won on the backs of trans and gender-nonconforming people who continue to struggle. Stonewall can be the start of a conversation about what’s wrong with how the gay rights movement — and even its well-meaning members — has represented its trans siblings. Gay people who now find themselves with a measure of power need to listen and learn, before they continue to make movies that trample on our history.

    Read more here: Buzz Feed Home
        

  10. Read the full post.
    Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) after throwing the first brick.
    Phillippe Bosse
    Roland Emmerich’s Stonewall, however unwittingly, perfectly symbolizes how the mainstream gay rights movement has treated trans and gender-nonconforming people ever since the fateful Stonewall Riots more than four decades ago. We’re comrades, even “sisters,” when our numbers and our willingness to put ourselves on the line for the LGBT cause are needed, but we’re also the first to get tossed aside to pave the way for more “respectable” queer people.
    Controversy has dogged Stonewall since the first trailer indicated that the film, inspired by the real-life riots of 1969, would be led by a fictional white gay protagonist, Danny Winters (Jeremy Irvine) as he navigates life in the big city while surrounded by a racially-diverse gang of femme street urchins. Stonewall proves to be much less about the riots than it is about the coming-of-age of its main character, Danny, a promising young man from Indiana who’s forced to arrive in New York a few months before he’s set to start his first year at Columbia University.
    Danny senses that the center of gay culture in New York City is Christopher Street, so that’s where he ends up. After getting beaten by some anti-gay policemen, he finds support and friendship in Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), a young street hustler drawn to wearing shiny clothes and lipstick, who develops a fondness for Danny’s blond, wholesome good looks, as does practically everyone he meets. From this point on, the film shifts back and forth between Danny’s new reality among the gay hustlers — his friends sleep twelve to a room after turning tricks all night — and the all-American Midwestern town he left behind. Plenty of screen time is devoted to Danny’s recent history as told in flashback: Danny gets kicked out of the house when his dad — who, of course, is also his high school’s football coach — finds out that his son is fooling around with none other than, you guessed it, the hunky star quarterback, Joe (Carl Glusman).
    Danny’s stint with the gay and gender non-conforming sex workers of the Village adds interspersed color and spice to his foregrounded white-bread Americana upbringing, of which we see plenty — the impending Stonewall riots, and the street kids who will start them, are merely window dressing to Danny’s storyline of self-acceptance, rather than the center of the story in their own right.

    Danny, Ray (Jonny Beauchamp), and Cong (Vladimir Alexis).
    Philippe Bosse
    Eventually, Danny and Ray find themselves at the Stonewall Inn where they meet Trevor (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a member of the Mattachine Society, a gay rights group that advocated for change through “respectable” means. When Danny attends a meeting, after which Trevor conveys his belief that it’s in suits rather than dresses that the gay rights struggle will be won. Danny defends Ray and his femme friends: “It takes a lot more balls to wear a dress than a fucking suit and tie.” Then Danny sleeps with Trevor anyway, and ends up living with him for awhile, until Trevor finds another young waif and Danny feels betrayed.
    Of the femme friends Danny defends, a few are based on actual people who were at the Stonewall riots. Marsha P. Johnson (Otoja Abit) is present, a black trans leader who later co-founded the trans rights organization Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (STAR). Ray is a composite of several figures, one of whom is the other STAR founder Sylvia Rivera, a Latina trans activist who was part of the riots, but was eventually kicked out of the gay movement she helped incite. Johnson is at best a tangential part of the movie’s narrative, a symbol for the “extreme” faction of the gay community. As Trevor explains to Danny, the police “only arrest the trannies” when raiding Stonewall – Marsha is that lone figure who gets to stand for the “tranny” faction (though Cong, another member of Danny and Ray’s gang, is female-presenting part-time). Marsha represents the film’s token nod to trans women, while also providing one-dimensional comic relief: she pops up to be fabulous and trot out one-liners, including one the real Johnson had actually said: the P. in her middle name stands for “Pay It No Mind.”
    Even if gender-nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    Ray is an odder case. He seems to flit back and forth between genders, occasionally called Ramona by friends, though Danny insists on using his male name. After Marsha’s first appearance, when she greets Ray and his friends, Ray says, “Marsha’s the only drag queen that’s nice to us” — implying that he is a feminine gay man and Marsha is the Other. But when Marsha later gets arrested during a raid at the Stonewall because she presents as female — violating the New York penal code that, in 1969, required people to wear at least three articles of clothing “appropriate” to their gender — Ray gets arrested along with her. It’s an indication of how the movie wants Ray to be just gender-nonconforming enough so that he at least has some relationship to historical reality, but not so gender-variant that he couldn’t be claimed as a cisgender gay person. Marking him as fully trans would undermine the popular ideology that portrays the riots as led by “gay” people. Even if gender nonconforming people called themselves “gay” or “queens” in 1969, they were policed and marginalized the way trans people — especially trans women of color — are today.
    While people protested the trailer because Danny is depicted as throwing the first brick to incite the riots, that scene is actually one of the less cringe-inducing moments in Stonewall. Danny’s brick-throwing was clearly done with the support and collaboration of the street hustler femmes around him, particularly Cong. The movie also keeps with historical accounts that an anonymous butch dyke was the riot’s first agitator. And even though Marsha Johnson herself has been credited by some as the first brick-thrower, the truth of who actually did it has been lost in history — though the chances that it was a strapping white guy from Indiana are pretty slim.
    It would have been nice if male-assigned feminine people could have played an even more prominent role in Stonewall, especially since they are presented as so debased that they do not deserve to be loved. Ray, the gender-nonconforming Latino, has little agency in the film beyond striving for Danny’s affection, in the tired trope of male-assigned femme serving as ultimate victim who can only potentially be saved by the love and protection of a good man (harkening back to films like The Crying Game and Dallas Buyers Club). When, after the riots, Danny tells Ray he can’t possibly return his love, he consoles him by saying, “You’ll always be my sister.” Then Danny proceeds to leave Christopher Street behind for a presumably much higher quality of life at Columbia — only coming back to his old haunt a year later when there’s a gay parade.
    Ray and the gang seem happy to see him upon his return, even though Ray accused Danny of “just slumming it” for the sake of a “funny story” when he once lived among the hustlers. There’s no sign that Ray or his street friends are in any better condition than when Danny met them, though at least Danny has learned from his experience and grown to be a better person, as cis white people tend to do after spending time with the downtrodden.
    The film creates a hierarchy — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white.
    Even though, when rejecting Ray after the riots, Danny says “I’m too mad to love anyone right now,” he goes back to Indiana in the very next scene and professes his love for the white closeted football player Joe, who had refused to support him when he’d been thrown out of the house. Joe once again rejects him, because he has a wife and kid on the way.
    Joe is nothing but a classic gay porn fantasy: the quarterback of the football team; a guy so masculine that no one can tell he’s gay; a guy who’s happy to get a blowjob but would never demean himself by reciprocating. When he and Danny had originally gotten caught fooling around together, Joe told Danny’s father that Danny seduced him and got him drunk, so he didn’t even know what was happening. And yet by the end of the movie, Joe is still the ultimate figure of Danny’s desire, the misunderstood guy he continues to love despite the fact that he has no redeeming qualities except for being hot (if you’re into hyper-masculine, unexpressive, closeted white gay men).
    The film thus creates a hierarchy of masculinity for those who are assigned male — the more masculine you are, the more lovable you are, and so much the better if you’re white. Joe, the “straight” guy who experiments, comes first; then comes Trevor, the straight-laced respectable activist; then we have Ray, the guy who puts on lipstick but doesn’t fully identify as a woman, so he can at least dream of being with Danny. Finally, there’s Marsha P. Johnson, who’s portrayed as an accessory who can’t dream of being loved, whose body is only available for sex work. This doesn’t even account for the fact that lesbians are barely present in the movie — there’s only one butch dyke with a few lines, and during the riots, what appears to be a single lesbian couple kissing in a sea of men. These hierarchies also correspond with access to political rights and social acceptance through the years, hierarchies that trans and gender-nonconforming people are constantly fighting against, and that the mainstream gay rights movement has historically upheld at our expense.
    Stonewall ends appropriately, with tributes to real-life people who were portrayed in the film. Then there’s a black and white picture of the half-fictional gang headed by Danny, with a caption that reads: “This movie is dedicated to the unsung heroes of the Stonewall Riots.” The filmmakers had the opportunity to recognize and give agency to those unsung heroes — Johnson, Rivera, and the full spectrum of gay, trans, and gender-nonconforming people who fought for queer liberation that night — but instead, they chose to minimize trans contributions to spotlight the (made up) cute white twink from the Midwest.
    If the gay rights movement wishes to come of age like Danny, then it must also recognize the ways in which queer respectability has been won on the backs of trans and gender-nonconforming people who continue to struggle. Stonewall can be the start of a conversation about what’s wrong with how the gay rights movement — and even its well-meaning members — has represented its trans siblings. Gay people who now find themselves with a measure of power need to listen and learn, before they continue to make movies that trample on our history.

  11. Stormé DeLarverie, Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera: Stonewall

    Stormé DeLarverie was a butch lesbian whose scuffle with police was one of the defining moments of the Stonewall uprising, spurring the crowd to action. She was born in New Orleans, to an African American mother and a white father.

    https://doctanian.files.wordpress.com/2015/08/james-baldwin-on-being-poor-black-and-gay.mp3
    Not surprising that she has been literally erased from the new Stonewall film and that the people who started the movement have become secondary characters in an important tale. Two transgender women of color; Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera are the two main heroins in the Stonewall riots, that have become secondary characters in their own film. On the positive side, the LGBT community has come out against the film strongly. If you don’t support us all, then you don’t support us at all.

    Marsha P. Johnson was an African American drag queen and gay liberation activist. A veteran of the Stonewall riots, Johnson was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey and was a popular figure in New York City’s gay and art scene from the 1960s to the 1990s.

    Sylvia Rae Rivera was an American drag queen, gay liberation and transgender activist. She was a founding member of both the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2014/06/03/mourning-storme-delarverie-a-mother-of-the-stonewall-riots/
    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/30/nyregion/storme-delarverie-early-leader-in-the-gay-rights-movement-dies-at-93.html?_r=0
    http://www.transadvocate.com/so-what-was-stonewall_n_8424.htm

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    by Latti Ice on August 9, 2015
    • Permalink

    Posted in Ancient History and Modern History

    Tagged Hollywood, james baldwin, lgbt rights, marsha p. johnson, stonewall, Stormé DeLarverie, Sylvia Rae Rivera, sylvia rivera, Transgender, White Washing

    Posted by Latti Ice on August 9, 2015
    http://sincereignorance.com/2015/08/09/storme-delarverie-marsha-p-johnson-and-sylvia-rivera-stonewall/

  12. leaveiss says:


    This was my make up to go out on Friday night.
    Eyes: Kiko #412 “Light Green” glamorous eye pencil / Urban Decay “Dragon”, “Bobby Dazzle” (both from the Vice 3 palette) & “Loaded” (from the Smoked palette) / Benefit “They’re Real” mascara
    Lips: Nars “Yu” satin lip pencil
        
    My make up for today.
    Eyes: Urban Decay “Lucky”, “Downfall” & “Truth” (From the Vice 3 palette) / Make Up Forever “Aqua Black” / Benefit “They’re Real” mascara
    Lips: Sisley #7 “Ruby” perfect lipliner / M.A.C. “Viva Glam Rihanna” lipstick

    I went to my first Pride this week end. I had a ton of fun and met lots of new and awesome people! Also it was an excuse for me to take a closer look at Drag Queens’ make up, which I’ve always been curious about.
         
       
    For those of you who are not familiar with it, the Pride Parade is a commemoration of the Stonewall Riots that occured on June 28th, 1969 in New York City. Nowadays it celebrates diversity and advocates gender equality as well as equal rights for people from the LGBT community.
    Partager :TwitterFacebookGoogleLike this:Like Loading…

  13. […] time to see that drag queens and genderqueers did indeed actively participate in the riot, despite claims from people like gay historian Wayne R. Dyer that transgender people were not involved, mostly […]

  14. Adventures in Black Leather: After our Victory, Our Struggle Continues


  15. HUFFINGTON POST ALERT: Supreme Court legalizes gay marriage nationwide
    It’s been 3 weeks since that email notification flashed across my iPhone’s screen. It still sits in my inbox, a daily reminder that elicits a tiny thrill as I am reminded again of the power of those words. I was in the middle of a conversation with a work colleague when I saw the alert. I broke off, mid-sentence, and rushed to my car. I wasn’t sure if I would scream, or shout, or dance, or cry. In the end, I sat in silence in my car for 30 minutes and let the joy wash over me.
    I was happy for all the kids who wouldn’t have to grow up like I did, thinking that things such as marriage and children were off the table as gay men (the 80s was a MUCH simpler time, looking back, or maybe I just didn’t know where to look). I was happy because I was witness to something I never expected to see. With just a few hundred words, the Supreme Court had transformed the lives of millions of Americans like me. It was a victory, of course, but for whom?
    Only 2 days prior, transgender activist Jennicet Gutiérrez had been ushered out of a White House LGBT Pride Month reception after she interrupted the President’s remarks to shine a light on the plight of LGBT immigration detainees. Her story and the public reaction to it got lost in the excitement of the gay marriage victory two days later. Let us not forget that people (including, and most dishearteningly, many gays) suggested that she was disrespectful, that she should wait her turn. It was all quite ugly to me. Oh, what short memories the gays have!
    It wasn’t so long ago that gay men were doing the interrupting, disrupting meetings, marching, and staging acts of civil disobedience. Should they have waited for their turn? Were they disrespectful of the authorities? They were fighting a government, a social system, a society that did not see them, did not value them. Their backs were against the wall! What were they to do? Society expected them to sit around and wait to die. They were not supposed to rock the boat. They were the weirdos, freaks, and sexual deviants.
    I submit that Ms. Gutiérrez was acting in that very same tradition. The plight of transwomen and particularly transwomen of color is terrible. Consider some facts from the National Transgender Discrimination Survey:
    50% of transgender people have experienced sexual violence.
    22-38% of trans people have been harassed by police, with upwards of 15% experiencing physical abuse and 7% being sexually assaulted by law enforcement.
    26% experienced physical assault and 10% lived through sexual assault at the hands of health care professionals.
    78% of gender non-conforming youth reported “significant abuse at school” —31% of the youth noted the abuse was from teachers.
    19% of respondents had experienced family violence because of their transgender identity or gender non-conformity.
    Jennicet Gutiérrez lives in this world. Her letter in the alphabet soup of LGBTQIA is likely less inclined to celebrate a victory on gay marriage when she and her friends are so much more likely to live in extreme poverty or be homeless. The gays have spent the past several weeks since the announcement planning lush, expensive, and undoubtedly tacky destination weddings, while she and other trans people like her live a life where political, economic, physical, and sexual violence at the hands of the state is routine. She perceives that the world does not value the lives of transgender people. She feels the distrust from those who should be her natural allies. That might be what hurts the most.
    Gay men should be standing beside her, shoulder to shoulder, in her fight, in OUR fight. That is not the case, though. Some of the loudest voices telling her to sit down and wait her turn were those of gay men. The disrespect shown to our transgender brothers and sisters is appalling. It is beyond ironic that some gays treat these men and women like the outsiders they once were. They perpetrate the violence done to them on others. They content themselves with the fantasy that all is well with the world just because you can turn on the TV and see reruns of Will and Grace or because there is a gay character on a hip-hop soap opera.
    We have forgotten where we came from. Remember that it was TRANS people who rose up at Stonewall. Were it not for Sylvia Rivera, Tammy Novak, Bambi, Ivan, Marsha Johnson, Stormé DeLarverie, Allyson Allante, Maria Ritter, Kiki, Birdy Rivera, Diane Kearney, Zazu Nova, Dario Modon, Christine Hayworth, Miss Peaches, and so many more, we wouldn’t even be here at this historic moment in American history. Yet now, we expect the sons and daughters of the very people who set us on this path to wait their turn? To keep their voices silent when their very lives are at stake?
    Let us not forget that we are not free until WE ARE ALL FREE. We are not truly victorious until everyone in that alphabet soup is free to pursue happiness. We cannot claim victory until women like Jennicet Gutiérrez no longer live in a world where she feels so powerless that she has to shout at the President of the United States.

  16. atclibertad says:

    A pesar del progreso, de las circunstancias que dieron origen a la rebelión que comenzó el movimiento moderno de los derechos de los LGBTI no han cambiado tanto como podríamos pensar.
    CRISTAN WILLIAMS · DESTACADOS · HISTORIA
    Stonewall Bar 1969 07-02-69. Disturbance on Sheridan Square, NYC. Scenes at Christopher St. and 7th Ave. South with police trying to clear crowds. Pictured, Stonewall Inn which was raided one day last week.(Larry Morris/The New York Times)

    “Así que, ¿cuál fue Stonewall?”
    A raíz del histórico discurso del Presidente referencia a Stonewall, NPR publicó un artículo preguntando y que pretende responder a la pregunta: “Entonces, ¿cuál fue Stonewall?” El artículo hace un llamado a Martin Duberman, ahora de 82 años, para volver a contar la historia de Stonewall. Martin Duberman publicó la primera historia de Stonewall en 1993. Su historia aparece significativamente popular trans. Curiosamente, el autor NPR Liz Halloran parece volver a escribir la historia de Duberman, pasar muchas líneas minimizando el aspecto trans de Stonewall:

    “Me gustó la mezcla de gente”, dijo. “No estaba lleno, ya que algunas cuentas tienen, con drag queens y buscavidas de la calle – que era una buena mezcla de jóvenes y de mediana edad, próspero y no próspero.”
    Gorilas en la puerta proyectarán los clientes, pero no pudieron mantener fuera a la policía, que con cierta frecuencia se “escapó” de la barra, ROUST los clientes, y tal vez acusarlos de infracciones que van desde la vagancia a las regulaciones específicas que en el momento dirigidos hombres gay .
    “Ellos estaban usando cualquier excusa”, dijo Duberman. “Por ejemplo, había que estar usando al menos cuatro piezas de vestimenta” apropiada de género ‘. ”
    La noche del 28 de junio de 1969, era diferente.
    Cuando la policía allanó la barra, y empujaron a los clientes fuera, dijo Duberman, los hombres empezaron a tirar las cosas vuelvan a la policía – monedas, ladrillos; finalmente, un parquímetro.

    Esto le deja con una cierta impresión. Echemos un vistazo a la forma en la presentación de informes de Halloran de la cuenta del Duberman difiere de lo Duberman mismo escribió:

    Amante [de Sylvia], Gary, había llegado a lo largo; Tammy, Bambi, e Iván estaban allí; y se rumoreaba que Marsha Johnson, disgustado a todos los no-shows para su cumpleaños … cuando los policías llegaron disparaba a través de la puerta principal.
    El siguiente que supo, los policías, con su arrogancia habitual, fueron pisando fuerte a través, ordenando a los clientes a alinear y obtener su ID de listo para su examen. “Oh, Dios mío!” Sylvia gritó a Gary. “Yo no traje mi ID!” Antes de que pudiera entrar en pánico, Gary mano en el bolsillo y sacó su tarjeta que había traído consigo. “Alabado sea Santa Bárbara!” Sylvia chilló, arrebatando la preciosa ID. Si el ataque fue de acuerdo con el patrón habitual, las únicas personas detenidas serían aquellos sin identificaciones, los vestidos con las ropas del sexo opuesto, y algunos o todos los empleados.
    Sylvia trató de tomar con calma; que había pasado muchas peores, y con su ID en la mano y nada más que el maquillaje, ella sabía que la molestaba sería mínimo. Pero ella estaba enojado; el bien alta que había tenido se había ido, y sus terminaciones nerviosas se sentía tan crudo como cuando ella había estado llorando sobre Judy temprano en la noche … Estaba harta de ser tratados como escoria: “Yo no estaba de humor,” era cómo ella más tarde lo puso. “Había llegado al punto en el que yo no quería ser molestado nunca más.” Cuando uno de los policías agarraron el ID de la mano y le preguntó con una sonrisa si era un niño o una niña, ella casi abanicó él, pero Gary agarró de la mano en el tiempo …
    Algunos de los patrones emergentes campier, uno por uno desde el Stonewall para encontrar un público inesperado, aprovecharon la oportunidad para atacar poses instantáneas, estilo estrella, mientras que los espectadores silbaron y gritaron sus calificaciones aplauso-metro. Pero cuando un furgón policial se detuvo, el ambiente se volvió más sombrío. Y creció hosco cuando los policías comenzaron a emerger de Stonewall con los presos en el remolque y se trasladó con ellos hacia la furgoneta esperando. Jim Fouratt en la parte posterior de la multitud, Sylvia pie con Gary cerca del pequeño parque al otro lado de la calle de Stonewall, y Craig encaramado en lo alto de la multitud, todo sentido algo inusual en el aire, todos sintieron una especie de esperanza tensa.
    … Algunas personas comenzaron a abuchear y otros presionan contra la camioneta de espera, mientras que los policías de pie cerca de él gritó con furia de la multitud para retroceder. Según Sylvia “, se podía sentir la electricidad pasando por la gente. Usted podría sentir. Las personas estaban recibiendo muy, muy enfadado y tenso. “Un hombre en una camiseta de color rojo oscuro bailaba dentro y fuera de la multitud, gritando” Nadie va a joder conmigo! “Y” No va a tomar esta mierda! ”
    Sylvia vio Tammy Novak entre las tres reinas en fila para el furgón policial, y junto con otras personas en la multitud comenzó a gritar “Tammy! Tammy! “- Grito de Sylvia ris-ción por encima del resto. Pero Tammy aparentemente no oyó, y Sylvia supuso que ella estaba demasiado drogado para saber lo que estaba pasando. Sin embargo, cuando un policía empujó Tammy y le dijo que “Manténgase en movimiento! Manténgase en movimiento! “, Como él la empujó con su club, Tammy le dijo que dejara de empujar, y cuando no lo hizo, empezó balanceo. A partir de ese momento, tanto sucedido tan rápidamente como para parecer simultánea.
    Jim Fouratt insiste en que el momento explosivo se produjo cuando “un dique vestida con ropa de hombre,” que había estado visitando a un trabajador de sexo masculino en el interior del bar, comenzaron a actuar como los policías la trasladaron hacia el furgón policial. Según Jim, “las reinas eran como reinas, lanzando su cambio y dando mucha actitud y el labio ing acto. Pero el dique tenía que ser más butch que las reinas. Así que cuando la policía la trasladó a la carreta, ella salió del otro lado y comenzó a mecerse ella “.
    – Stonewall por Martin B. Duberman, 1993
    Gee … ¿Tiene informes de Halloran de la cuenta del Duberman sonar un poco diferente a las propias palabras de Duberman a usted?
    Aquí hay otro relato histórico de esa noche por la historia trans blogger Zagria:
    Una de las primeras acciones informó que comenzaron los disturbios en la 27 ª , era que un policía golpeó a / transexual masculino femenino butch y que él golpeó la espalda. Se ha debatido si esto era Storme DeLarverie , que anteriormente fue el único imitador masculino en el Jewel Box Revue. Subinspector Pino ha declarado que la primera resistencia importante que se encontró en el bar era de los travestis. Allyson Allante , entonces de 14 años, fue detenido, al igual que María Ritter que estaba allí con su amiga Kiki para celebrar María siendo 18 y legalmente capaz de beber por primera vez. Queen Street, Birdy Rivera también estaba allí. Diane Kearney estaba en la zona y por un tiempo se unió a la multitud que observaba los acontecimientos. Tammy Novak había persuadido Sylvia Rivera Rae , sólo 17, para llegar hasta el Stonewall Inn por primera vez. Tammy fue arrestado y puesto en el furgón de drag queens, pero escapó en la confusión y corrió al apartamento de Joe Tish donde ella escondido para el fin de semana. Un oficial de policía poniendo Maria Ritter en el furgón policial había comentado que no podía creer que era un niño. Ella dijo que ella no estaba. Como algunas mujeres más trans fueron dirigidas en, María se acercó a su alrededor y se alejó. El mismo policía fue a interceptarla, pero como ella rompió en llanto, le indicó que se fuera. Marsha P. Johnson y Zazu Nova también estuvieron activos en los disturbios, y Michelle , Darío Modon y Christine Hayworth estuvieron presentes. Marsha se observó bajando un peso pesado en un coche de policía. Condado de Wayne (quien más tarde se convertiría Jayne) se reunió de Miss Peaches y Marsha P Johnson a la llegada y se dio cuenta de lo que estaba pasando. Se unió a una marcha improvisada hacia arriba y abajo de la calle Christopher gritando “Poder gay!”.

    Es una pena que algunos historiadores cisgénero sienten la necesidad de extirpar personas trans de la historia extraña. Pero, esta no es la primera vez que el movimiento de Stonewall se ha vuelto a contar como el Cis movimiento de la pared:
    Un nuevo y extraño mito ha surgido acerca de los orígenes del movimiento gay. Este mito, fervientemente apoyado por algunos activistas trans, sostiene que el movimiento gay y lésbico era, en esencia y de forma articulada, el trabajo de su grupo, las personas transgénero. La gente transgénero estaban en la vanguardia, gays y lesbianas siguieron mansamente después. Esta afirmación extraña en lo contrario de la verdad.
    En primer lugar, el término “transexual” es un anacronismo, y como tal revelación de la agenda actual mentalidad de quienes esgrimen la misma. Para estar seguros, Christine Jorgensen había sido noticia con su cirugía de Dinamarca en 1953. Jorgensen, y las pocas personas que siguieron su ejemplo en el momento, tenía poco interés en los asuntos de los homosexuales, ya que creían que tenían verdaderamente convertirse en mujeres. Jorgensen fechada hombres y considera a sí misma como heterosexual. Lo mismo puede decirse de Reed (antes Rita) Erickson, un magnate petrolero rico que ayudó a financiar varias organizaciones de cambio social.
    Veamos a continuación, ser honestos. Si vamos a hablar de una contribución “transgénero” debemos limitamos a arrastrar reinas. Eran las únicas personas transgénero de todo en esos días. Ninguno de ellos, de hecho, hizo una importante contribución al movimiento.
    – Autor de la Enciclopedia de la homosexualidad, Wayne Dynes, 12/16/2009

    Los negadores no obtuvieron el 1969 llamada de Dick Liesch de NYC Mattachine que me di, “No vas a creer esto, pero las drag queens y diques de la calle son disturbios en las calles de la Villa.” A lo que respondió: “Usted tiene razón , no creo que “pero por suerte para todos nosotros era verdad … – Ray Hill.

    Aquí, el autor cisgénero de la Enciclopedia de la homosexualidad hace una serie de afirmaciones increíblemente cis-bias:
    “Transgénero” no existía en el momento de Stonewall. Esto es fácticamente incorrecta . El término existía, pero no fue ampliamente utilizado en el momento de Stonewall.
    Desde “transgénero” supuestamente aún no había acuñado, no había ninguna comunidad trans. De hecho, esta comunidad se refiere generalmente a una la “TV / TS comunidad” o nos llama simplemente “reinas” (a veces todos se nos acaba de llamar ‘ más genéricamente, “gay”. El Frente de Liberación de Queens se formó travestis ‘) y en 1969 por la gente trans y fue el que hizo el QLF maniobras legales post-Stonewall que llevó a un cierto grado de igualdad de post-Stonewall para la comunidad gay ( sin embargo, que la gente trans cayó sobre nuestras espadas para que esto suceda para gente como Dynes).
    La comunidad de arrastre no es parte de la comunidad trans, y además … drag queens eran irrelevantes para el movimiento de la igualdad. Este despido frívolo es probablemente más molesto para mí. Es como decir: “Tú no eras importante … Y si alguna vez encuentra que algo que hiciste fue importante, no fue mayormente importante.” El hecho es que la gente trans eran, en el muy menos, parte del grupo que instigó los disturbios de Stonewall y folk trans pagado por las batallas legales que siguieron Stonewall. Además de eso la gente trans pagado por y organizado las reuniones nacionales extrañas antes de Stonewall además financiando la Sociedad Mattachine con el dinero recaudado en los eventos trans. Dynes despectivamente se refiere a Reed Erickson (usando su nombre anterior a la transición para arrancar!) Como si el hecho de que Erickson financiado prácticamente toda la investigación raro significativa antes, durante y después de la época de Stonewall era sólo una nota al pie de menor importancia queer historia!
    Hay algunos que, por desgracia, tratar de asegurar que los héroes trans se borran de la historia GLBT. En lugar de ser considerada como la punta de la lanza – o, al menos, un socio igual – la narración se convierte en la popular trans han sido montando en los faldones de la comunidad gay. Aunque NPR simplemente ayudó a perpetuar esa narrativa, no fueron los primeros en tratar de borrar popular trans de la faz de Stonewall:

    Las mujeres en el GLF se sentían incómodos en referencia a Rivera que insistió en el uso de los baños de las mujeres, incluso en el Ayuntamiento, como “ella”. Montada presión. El año 1973 choque testigo que tomaría Rivera del movimiento para las próximas dos décadas. Su amiga de toda la vida y compañero de Stonewall veterano Bob Kohler recordaron, “Sylvia dejó el movimiento porque después de los primeros tres o cuatro años, se le negó el derecho a hablar.” Fue durante la manifestación del Orgullo en Washington Square Park después del Día de la Liberación Christopher Street Marzo.
    Para consternación de Lesbianas Feministas Liberación drag queens estaban programados para realizarse. Al pasar volantes delineando su oposición a los “transformistas”, Rivera luchó para el micrófono en manos de maestro de ceremonias Vitto Russo, antes de ser golpeado con ella misma. Rivera explicó: “Tuve que luchar mi camino en el escenario, y, literalmente, ser golpeado y golpeado alrededor por personas que pensé que eran mis compañeros, para llegar a ese micrófono. Llegué al micrófono y le dije a mi pieza. “Rivera se quejó de que la gente de clase media le importaba poco o nada acerca del acoso continuo y detenciones de drag queens calle. Sangrado, Rivera cantó, “Usted consiguió tener amigos”, gritó “Revolution Now!” Y llevado a la multitud en un canto de “Dame una G, Dame una A, dame una Y … ¿Qué hechizo?” Apenas audible , la voz quebrada, “POWER GAY”, se quejó.
    – Benjamin Shepard, “Sylvia y niños de Sylvia: La Batalla por un espacio público Queer,” Eso es repugnante! (Ed. Matt Bernstein Sycamore)
    Después de que ocurrieron los hechos anteriores, RadFems anti-trans subieron al escenario:
    O’Leary tomó en la audiencia rebelde mientras caminaba hacia la parte delantera del escenario abierto. Algunos hombres estaban silbando y abucheando, drag queens maldecían a ella, y ella podía ver a los hombres y mujeres empujándose unos a otros en el parque. Russo, [el evento MC] un hombre delgado y de voz suave, se declaró a la calma, su voz temblorosa: “¡Escucha su”, dijo. “Usted ha escuchado a todos los demás. Eso es lo menos que podemos hacer por ella. “La multitud se calmó. O’Leary relató cómo el Lesbianas Feministas Liberación había negociado durante diez días para tener la oportunidad de hablar. “Debido a una persona, un hombre, Sylvia, se levanta aquí y provoca un alboroto”, señaló O’Leary, las lesbianas habían finalmente ganó su lugar. “Creo que eso dice algo”, dijo. Ella procedió a leer la declaración, atacando a los hombres que “hacen pasar por mujeres por razones de entretenimiento y utilidades”, diciendo que “las mujeres de desacato.” Hubo más silbidos y gritos de la audiencia.
    Cualquier esperanza de que la administración de un momento a Jean O’Leary y Sylvia Rivera terminaría esta borrasca desapareció el momento Lee Brewster subió al escenario. También él estaba en su arrastre, con maquillaje de ojos de espesor, una peluca rubia exuberante cayendo sobre sus hombros y la corona de una reina que descansa sobre la peluca. “No puedo sentarme y dejar que mi pueblo se insultaron”, dijo Brewster. “Me han acusado de que le recuerda demasiadas veces que hoy está celebrando lo que fue el resultado de lo que hicieron los drag queens en el Stonewall. Uno va a los bares a causa de lo que reinas drag hizo para usted, y estas perras “-hizo un gesto hacia la lesbians-” nos dicen que dejar de ser nosotros mismos. “Vito Russo se acercó a Brewster, pasó el brazo por la cintura de Brewster y le susurró al oído, pero Brewster lo empujó fuera.
    “Liberación gay”, Brewster declaró: “arruinas! Voy a entrar en mi armario! “Con eso, la reina echó su corona en la audiencia, que a estas alturas era casi en reyerta.
    – Para bien: la lucha por construir un movimiento por los derechos gay en Estados Unidos, 2001, pp 171-172

    Ahora te importa, esto sucedió en 1973. En 1973, el folk trans había estado luchando la batalla legal de la comunidad LGBT en los tribunales durante más de 3 años!

    Después de una batalla de tres años y medio de duración, un proyecto de ley para prohibir la discriminación contra los homosexuales en el empleo, la vivienda y los lugares públicos fue votado fuera del Comité de Bienestar general del Ayuntamiento de Nueva York.
    La medida obtuvo la aprobación de siete de los ocho miembros del comité en la mano después de que se aprobó una enmienda relativa a los travestis. Este fue el quinto intento de conseguir el proyecto de ley por el comité. La enmienda declaró que nada en la definición de la orientación sexual “se interpretará para llevar sobre las normas de vestimenta o vestido de código.” La enmienda fue clave para el paso comité y el texto había sido elaborado cuidadosamente por Theodor S. Weiss y Carter Carga .
    Bebe Scarpie, Director de Queens Frente de Liberación, se reunió en el Ayuntamiento con los patrocinadores y el abogado de QLF, Richard Levidow, una semana antes de la votación sobre el proyecto de ley. Sra Scarpie y Levidow abogado presentaron a la redacción anterior como alternativa a conseguir el proyecto de ley aprobado. La cláusula, según el Sr. Levidow es inconstitucional y no se llevará a cabo en los tribunales debido a la protección “igualdad de derechos” de la Constitución de Estados Unidos. “QLF cedió en ser incluido en esta ley porque los políticos estaban usando el travesti como un” chivo expiatorio “para no aprobar el proyecto de ley”, dice Lee Brewster, ex director y fundador de QLF.
    Queens Frente de Liberación no emitirá un comunicado oficial sobre el proyecto de ley hasta que sea aprobada o derrotado, que parece posible, ya que nos vamos a la imprenta.
    – Arrastrar Magazine, 1973

    Y así lo hizo la caída trans comunidad sobre su propia espada para que la comunidad gay podría disfrutar de un poco de igualdad. Y así comenzó una larga y dolorosa tradición de la comunidad GLB cisgénero lanzando popular trans (de cualquiera y todas las tendencias) bajo el autobús, año tras año dolorosa .

    [soundcloud url="http://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/71779612"]

    El clip de arriba es de Ray Colina * hablar sobre el 1979 de marzo en Washington (MOW). Hill había asistido a las reuniones nacionales organizadas por la comunidad trans NY. Estas reuniones nacionales trans organizada facilitaron el nacimiento del movimiento nacional raro que llevó al 1979 MOW. Aún así, la gente trans continuó sentirse barridos por sus hermanos y hermanas cis. Hill se refería a este sentimiento creciente en la grabación anterior.

    Colina: De las 18 personas, entre ellas Rita, David y yo que fue a la Conferencia de Organizaciones homophile América del Norte en 19 y 68, David y yo, y otros dos sobreviven. Ese fue el liderazgo nacional.
    Cristan Williams: Siempre que tuvo lugar – yo sé los términos han cambiado con los años – pero, ¿había alguien que podía …
    Hill … Considerado ahora trans? ¡Sí! ¡Claro!
    – Entrevista con Ray Hill, Transgénero Archivo, Houston, Texas

    Popular Trans, te guste o no, han sido una parte importante de la igualdad LGBT desde el primer momento. Esta transfóbica cis-lavado de la historia raro tiene que terminar. La vergüenza comunitaria autodirigido es, en este punto, simplemente triste y se debe parar.
    Crossposted de Ehipassiko ×
    * NOTA: Ray Hill es un activista LGBT nacional temprana derecha desde Houston, Texas, y fue el organizador principal del 1979 MOW. El Archivo de Radio Pacifica tiene una grabación de Hill y Harvey Milk discutir planes para el MOW. La grabación en este post se hizo en la 15 Annual (2007) Transgénero Unidad de Banquetes en Houston, Texas.
    Cristan WilliamsEditor en Jefe en TransAdvocate
    Cristan Williams es un investigador histórico trans y pionero en el tratamiento de las necesidades prácticas de la comunidad transgénero. Empezó el primer refugio para desamparados trans y co-fundó la primera de sólo trans programa de personas sin hogar con fondos federales, pionero de atención médica asequible para las personas trans en el área de Houston, ganó el derecho de las personas trans a cambiar su género en Tejas Identificación antes de la cirugía, iniciado numerosos programas de servicios sociales trans y fundó el Centro Transgénero, así como el Archivo transgénero. Cristan es el editor en los sitios de justicia social y TransAdvocate.com TheTERFs.com, preside el Grupo de Planificación de la Ciudad de la prevención del VIH Houston, es el representante jurisdiccional para la Coalición Urbana para el VIH / SIDA Servicios de Prevención (UCHAPS), es miembro de la dirección nacional cuerpo para UCHAPS y es el Director Ejecutivo de la Fundación Transgénero de América.
    http://www.transadvocate.com/so-what-was-stonewall_n_8424.htm
    El Stonewall Inn
    El edificio en el 51 y el 53 de Christopher Street en Nueva York Greenwich Village fue originalmente construida 1843-6 como establos. Los caballos de todos los negros que entregan las mercancías para Saks Fifth Avenue se alojaron allí hasta que los vehículos motorizados llegaron a la vuelta del siglo. En 1930, durante la prohibición del alcohol, los dos edificios se convirtieron en uno, y se abrieron como un salón de té , Pared de piedra de Bonnie, el nombre de la autobiografía La Pared de piedra por María Casal , uno de los primeros libros que seamos abiertos sobre el amor lésbico. El salón de té más tarde se amplió en un restaurante. En 1940 pasó a llamarse de Bonnie Stonewall Inn, y por la década de 1960, el Stonewall Inn Restaurant. El parque enfrente del Stonewall Inn contiene una estatua del general Sheridan, y mediante un proceso de fusión, a veces se asume erróneamente que tanto la estatua y el Inn son una referencia al general Stonewall Jackson , el comandante confederado que murió después de ser golpeado por un simpático fuego. mafioso Vito Genovese compró bares gay en la década de 1930, incluyendo el 82 club . El FBI lo dirigido en la década de 1950, y lo condenó en 1959 el tráfico de heroína, y murió en la cárcel en febrero de 1969. Su mano derecha que dirigía las raquetas bar gay era Anthony Strollo . Desapareció en abril de 1962, y de acuerdo a fuentes de la policía murió aplastado en el asiento de su coche, ya que se llevó a cabo a través de un compresor de chatarra. La Stonewall Inn Restaurant fue destruida por el fuego a mediados de la década de 1960 y, después de unos años de estar vacío, fue reabierto como un bar gay marzo 1967 por Tony Lauria, el hijo de un antiguo mafioso que no aprueba ‘barras fag’, y tres socios, asistidos por Chuck Shaheen. Hubo también un socio adicional que no puso ningún dinero: Mateo Ianniello , conocido como el Caballo de Matty, debido a la fuerza de su golpe, fue el coordinador de los bares gay para las familias del crimen Genovese, Gambino y Colombo. El Stonewall Inn se convirtió en el mayor negocio gay en el momento en los EE.UU.. Era el único bar en Nueva York para los hombres gay que permitieron el baile, que era su principal atractivo. La Autoridad de Licor del Estado de Nueva York se negó licencias de licor a cualquier bar que atiende a clientes abiertamente homosexuales. Esto creó un monopolio de la delincuencia organizada que tuvo el placer de correr bares sin licencia y para pagar a la policía. El Stonewall Inn fingió ser un club privado de botella, y se utiliza una carta que había sido concedida a la Red Social Club Cisne en 1929. También regaron las bebidas y el licor utilizado obtuvieron de secuestros de camiones. La habitación de arriba se accede por una entrada trasera de West 10 ª Street, y desde allí prostitutas muchacho y la heroína se distribuyeron, pero la gente gay de la planta baja no sabía nada de esto. No había agua corriendo detrás de la barra: vasos se lavaron en un recipiente con agua antes de ser reutilizada. No había salidas de emergencia y los baños menudo invadieron. El Departamento de Salud de la Ciudad de Nueva York había trazado varios casos de hepatitis volver el Stonewall, y se considera el cierre de la misma. Al igual que con otros bares gay, el Inn fue asaltada con frecuencia: en promedio una vez al mes. La dirección general sabía acerca de las incursiones de antelación. Sólo unos pocos clientes favorecidos por hombres sanos fueron permitidos en si vestido como mujer, aunque algunos clientes llevaban maquillaje y la hicieron su pelo en un estilo femenino – en ese momento en que se conocen como las reinas de llama . Joe Tish , imitador de mujer, que tenía un programa de larga duración en el Crazy Horse fue uno de los que se negó la entrada cuando en el vestuario, a pesar de que estaba tan admitido en algunos clubes rectas uptown. Tammy Novak , que había vivido con Tony y Chuck, fue admitido en la ropa femenina. Désirée , una belleza natural que fácilmente se pasa como femenino, pasó un tiempo en el Stonewall, y tomaron allí con Petey, un gángster free-lance. Se mudaron a los suburbios para vivir como una pareja heterosexual, hasta Petey, en un ataque de celos, disparó y la mató. Otras mujeres trans mencionados en el Stonewall eran Tiffany y spañola Jerry . Barbara Eden , que trabajaba en el guardarropa, aparecerían en su totalidad arrastre de vez en cuando. Reinas de la calle que no podían pagar la cuota de inscripción en el Stonewall Inn se encuentran a menudo en el parkette lado de la calle, lo que resultó ser un lugar ideal para unirse a la revuelta. Ambas personas entre hombres con cuerpo de vestir femenina y femenina de cuerpo personas en el vestir masculino eran responsables para detener si se detecta en una redada policial. La policía utilizó una regla que usted debe estar usando al menos tres elementos apropiados a su “sexo real”. Enid Gerling era abogado de la casa de la barra, y ella representa a menudo los que fueron arrestados cuando fue allanada. La redada policial el viernes 27 de junio 1969, (en realidad en las primeras horas del sábado), sólo unas horas después de la Judy Garland funeral, fue coordinada por el subinspector Seymour Pino , quien utilizó la excusa de que el bar estaba sin licencia. La redada se llevó a cabo sin el conocimiento de la comisaría local, que era sospechoso de estar en la toma. Interpol había recuperado bonos negociados de Wall Street, que fueron apareciendo en Europa. Los bonos estaban siendo robados por empleados de Wall Street que fueron víctimas de una operación de chantaje dirigido por Ed Murphy, a veces llamado el cráneo de su tiempo como un luchador. Murphy trabajó veces la puerta, donde una tarea consistía en entregar los sobres a un representante de la Sexta Comisaría, se rumorea que será de $ 1,200 al mes .. Otras veces se comportaba como si fuera el director del Stonewall Inn. Murphy había cumplido condena por robar el oro de los consultorios dentales, y había sido detenido anteriormente por cargos de chantaje, pero también tenía fotografías incriminatorias de J. Edgar Hoover , y los cargos no habían sido perseguido. La policía de Nueva York descubrió que el robo de bonos fue atado a chantajear al Stonewall Inn, y la orden fue a cerrar el club.
    Storme DeLarverie (1920 – 2014) cantante, imitador de género.
    ++ Actualizado 05 2014 K. Storme DeLarverie nació en Nueva Orleáns. Ella era una cantante de jazz como Tormentoso Dale en los años 40, y el único imitador masculino en el Jewel Box Revue en los años 50 y 60. Después de iniciar con el espectáculo comenzó a vestirse con ropa de hombre fuera del escenario también. Sin embargo, señaló que su voz y movimientos como un imitador de sexo masculino fueron los mismos que cuando ella era una cantante de big band en los años 40. También hace un punto de no ser molestado acerca de si las personas abordan ella como “señor” o “señora”.
    Allyson Allante (1955 -) intérprete.
    . Creció en Long Beach, Long Island, Nueva York, Allyson Anderson tenía 14 años cuando ella estaba en el Stonewall Tavern el 27 de junio de 1969 y detenido en la primera noche de los disturbios Ella tomó su nombre de dos Lana Turner películas: la hija Allison en Peyton Place , 1957 , y Holly Anderson en Madame X, 1966. Ella se convirtió en la señora Allante por matrimonio. Ella ha estado casado con hombres en tres ocasiones. En los últimos años ha sido activo en la Asociación de Veteranos de Stonewall, y ha sido elegida Reina y presidente de las Reinas Imperial y reyes de Nueva York. Ella era la única verdadera persona transgénero Stonewall a aparecer en el 1996 Stonewall película . En 1997 ella era la única persona transgénero a hablar ante el Consejo de la ciudad de Nueva York para el Derecho Parejas.
    Birdy Rivera (194 -?) Reina de la calle.
    Robert Rivera venía de una familia puertorriqueña en el Bronx. Mientras que su padre judío tenía un amante masculino, padres de Robert no lo quieren todo. A los once años, se convirtió en la amante de Joe, un oficial de policía. Joe, que se convirtió en su tutor legal, insistió en que Vestidos de Birdy, y también lo golpearon. Birdy y otros gays en la escuela formaron una banda, el Comando de Queens. Ellos apostaron una reclamación a Riker, un restaurante en la calle Christopher y la Séptima Avenida, que se hizo cargo de los borrachos. Estaba en Stonewall. * No es la DJ. * No se conocen relación con Sylvia Rivera
    Diane Kearny (1940 -) HBS activista.
    Revisado 04 de diciembre 2009, de septiembre de 2013. Ver también . Una breve historia de (Harry) Benjamin Síndrome Kearny nació y se crió en Brooklyn, Nueva York, y en su adolescencia se correspondía con Virginia Prince – que le dijo que cualquiera que quiera un cambio de sexo fue delirante. Diane era una amiga de la prostituta transexual y pionero, Patricia Morgan , y conocía a algunos de los artistas de arrastre en el club 82 . Ella estaba en la calle, cuando los disturbios de Stonewall estalló en 1969. Más tarde, como Diane, que era un paciente de Harry Benjamin y Charles Ihlenfeld. Ella sólo tenía una entrevista psiquiátrica, y luego tuvo una cirugía con Roberto Granato Sr en 1972 en Brooklyn. Ser católica, ella entonces aplicado con éxito a tener el nombre y el sexo en su partida de bautismo modificada. En 1984 se casó. Estuvieron casados ​​durante 22 años antes de enviudar. Diane pasó su propio negocio. En 2004 Diane creó WATS, un foro transexual. En 2006 se encontró con Charlotte Goiar en los foros mujer australiana, y adoptó el concepto de Síndrome de Harry Benjamin de Goiar. Goiar participó en su foro, y ella y los demás estableció harrybenjaminsyndrome-info.org , (que se convirtió en ruinas alrededor de 2008), y luego harrybenjaminsyndrome.org (que también se convirtió en ruinas en 2010). Goiar y Kerny separaron y cada mantienen un sitio web y un foro. El sitio de Kearny material del Goiar del contenido http://www.shb-info.org , con pequeños cambios, e incluyó un Estándares muy similares de Cuidado. Su foro de Yahoo difería de Goiars al admitir sólo a las mujeres después de la operación, y harrybenjaminsyndrome.org , a diferencia http://www.shb-info.org , fue sólo en Inglés. El sitio definido HBS:
    Sylvia Rae Rivera (1951-2002) activista.
    Rey Rivera Mendoza, un neoyorquino huérfano de ascendencia puertorriqueña y venezolana, vivió dentro y fuera de las calles de los 11 años se convirtió en Sylvia y fue apadrinado en sus primeros días por Marsha P. Johnson . Ambos fueron participantes destacados en los disturbios de Stonewall , 1969, el origen icónico de Gay Lib. Sylvia solamente 17 en ese momento era. Ella fue miembro fundador tanto de la Nueva York Frente de Liberación Gay y los activistas gay de la Alianza , y ayudó a fundar ESTRELLA ( Calle Tran svestite revolucionarios de acción ) con Marsha para las reinas de la calle sin hogar. Organizó con Lee Brewster . En el 1973 Stonewall rally, una líder feminista se opuso a las personas trans y arrastre como burlándose de las mujeres. Sylvia y Lee saltaron al escenario y gritaron: “Uno va a los bares por lo que las reinas de arrastrar hizo por ti, y estas perras .! nos dicen que dejar de ser nosotros mismos ” Sylvia luchó mucho contra los líderes homosexuales asimilacionistas y el New York Campaña de Derechos Humanos (HRC) , que sería ignorar cuestiones transexuales. Ella luchó por maricones sin hogar. Ella también participó en Puerto Rico y el activismo negro jóvenes con los Young Lords y los Panteras Negras . Ella fue mentor Chelsea Godwin . Ella era un miembro activo de la Iglesia de la Comunidad Metropolitana de Nueva York . Ella se casó con una mujer trans compatriota Julia Murray . Desde 1997 vivió en Transy Casa , la casa de Rusty Mae Moore y Chelsea Godwin. Ella era un alcohólico en este momento, pero después de las discusiones con Rusty y Chelsea, se fue de golpe. Ella renovó su activismo político, dando discursos sobre la necesidad de la unidad entre las personas trans, y su posición en la vanguardia del movimiento GLBT. En 2000 se fue a Italia por la Marcha del Milenio, y fue aclamado como la Madre de todas las personas homosexuales. En 2001 revivió STAR y que lucharon por el Proyecto de Ley de Derechos transgénero ciudad de Nueva York y una trans incluido el estado de Nueva York Orientación Sexual No Discriminación Acta. También agitados por la justicia para Amanda Milan una mujer trans que había sido asesinado el año anterior. Ella todavía tenía que luchar con el HRC y el Empire State Pride Agenda (ESPA) que estaban descuidando cuestiones trans. Ella todavía estaba negociando con ESPA en su lecho de muerte. Murió, con Julia a su lado, por complicaciones de cáncer de hígado a los 50 años en su honor: raro refugio para jóvenes de MCC Nueva York se llama Lugar de Sylvia ; En 2005, la esquina de las calles Christopher y Hudson fue rebautizado Rivera Camino . El Proyecto de Ley Sylvia Rivera está dedicada “para garantizar que todas las personas son libres para auto-determinar la identidad y expresión de género, independientemente de sus ingresos o raza, y sin tener que enfrentar el acoso, la discriminación o la violencia”. * No se sabe están relacionados con Birdy Rivera.
    Marsha P. Johnson (1944 – 1992) activista, arrastre madre.
    Malcolm Michaels, Jr. creció en Hoboken y Elizabeth , tanto en Nueva Jersey. Malcolm transformaría a Marsha en el tren de cercanías en Nueva York. En 1966, Marsha mudó a Manhattan para siempre. Ella era conocida en Nueva York arrastrar y artes escenas de la década de 1960 a los años 90. A veces, ella trabajó como camarera, pero por lo general trabajó las calles. Ella era conocida por ayudar a otras travestis y gente de la calle, fue considerado como una madre de arrastre, y, en particular, fue un mentor para los jóvenes Sylvia Rivera . Ella panhandled y era a menudo en patines. Ella era profundamente religioso y tenía visiones. En los primeros días que era conocido como Negro Marsha, pero luego dejó caer el ‘Negro’, y se convirtió en Marsha P. Johnson. El P. como le gustaba explicar, incluyendo en una ocasión a un juez, se puso de pie para “Pay it ninguna mente”. El juez se rió y la dejó ir. Ella participó en las Stonewall disturbios en 1969, donde fue observado cayendo un peso pesado en un coche de policía. Fue co-fundador con Sylvia de ESTRELLA (Calle Travesti revolucionarios de acción) y participó activamente en la ESTRELLA House, que trató de alimentar a las personas sin hogar y los transies calle. También fue un artista y miembro de melocotones calientes , e hizo una gira por Londres con ellos. Ella nunca tuvo un pasaporte femenino, y tuvo que hacer drag masculina que pasar por inmigración. . Ella fue fotografiada por Andy Warhol En 1979 se reconoció varios atentados contra su vida por johns, ocho crisis nerviosas e innumerables detenciones – después de un centenar de ella dejó de contar. Marsha era considerado con razón como generosa a través de las décadas, pero cuando Malcolm se hizo cargo de que pudo . ser bastante desagradable, e incluso podría comenzar una pelea con alguien que dijo hola a él Marsha fue probablemente asesinado: su cuerpo fue encontrado flotando en el río Hudson poco después de la Marcha del Orgullo 1992, pero la policía se negó a investigar. Antony Hegarty ‘s banda, Antony and the Johnsons , lleva el nombre en homenaje a Marsha.
    Zazu Nova (194 -?) Trabajadora sexual, convicto.
    Zazu empujó en el bajo Manhattan a finales del decenio de 1960, a veces en la resistencia femenina. Ella anuncia a sí misma como la “Reina del Sexo ‘. Ella era de norte del estado de Nueva York, y un unitario acérrimo. Ella tenía un temperamento violento y había estado en la cárcel más de una vez. Se rumoreaba que había hecho por asesinato. A menudo lleva a una gran cadena en su bolso para la autodefensa. Ella estaba en la primera línea en el Stonewall disturbios en 1969 junto a Marsha Johnson .
    Darío Modon (1943 -) diseñador de moda.
    Darío se graduó en la New York School of Visual Arts en 1965, y empezó a hacer arrastre en Halloween. Avanzó a las bolas de arrastre y fiestas privadas. Él era 6’2 “(1.88m) y especializada en un sencillo vestido negro. Normalmente se fue al Stonewall Tavern los sábados a finales de 1960, pero pasó a estar allí el viernes 27 junio, 1969, cuando una redada policial se desarrolló en un alboroto. Él fue al hospital y tuvo seis puntos de sutura. Trabajó en la moda, el diseño de ropa interior y de noche, y fue uno de los que están detrás del breve vestido de papel de la década de 1960. Él encuentra que ya no hay nadie a hacer arrastre con, y tiene no hecho desde 1996. Desde la jubilación se ha convertido en un activista de derechos de los inquilinos.
    Christina Hayworth (194 -?) Activista.
    Actualización de enero de 2013. Un puertorriqueño, Hayworth era un coronel en el Ejército de Estados Unidos y fue parte de la ocupación estadounidense de Vietnam.
    Christina Rudy Guiliani.
    Christina estuvo presente en el Stonewall Tavern cuando los disturbios ocurridos en 1969. Ella era un organizador principal para la primera Parada Gay en Puerto Rico en 2003. Continuó como activista y periodista en Puerto Rico. Ella vuelve con frecuencia a Nueva York, y ella es el embajador Asociación de Veteranos de Stonewall de América Latina. En 2011 se postuló para senador en representación del Partido Nuevo Progresista. En 2013 Christina fue encontrado indigencia, viviendo en un edificio condenado, y llevado a un refugio por el Rev. Jorge Raschke, anteriormente conocido por sus posiciones anti-gay.
    Jayne County
    Nacido Wayne Rogers en 1947, el condado dejó su ciudad natal de Dallas, Georgia , en 1968 para trasladarse a la ciudad de Nueva York , donde se convirtió en un habitual en el Stonewall Inn y tomó parte en las revueltas históricas . En 1969, el condado le pidió a Warhol superstar y dramaturgo Jackie Curtis a aparecer en su obra, Femme Fatale , en el La MaMa Experimental Theatre Club , que también protagonizó Patti Smith . En su autobiografía, el condado de Curtis dice: “Ella era mi mayor influencia, la persona que realmente me inició.” Después de una exitosa carrera de Femme Fatale , Condado escribió Mundo – El nacimiento de una nación , que también apareció en, traerla a la atención de Andy Warhol , quien le dio un papel en su producción teatral, de cerdo . Después de una carrera en Nueva York, la obra, con el elenco de Nueva York, se llevó a cabo en Londres . A su regreso a Nueva York, Condado apareció en otro juego, Isla , por Tony Ingrassia, de nuevo con Patti Smith .
    En 1972 formó el Condado de la reina Isabel , una de las pioneras protopunk bandas. A pesar de haber firmado a Mainman Artistes , David Bowie empresa de gestión ‘s, no hay registros fueron jamás producidos. La compañía gastó más de 200.000 dólares para filmar la demostración de la etapa 1974, “Wayne en los camiones”, las imágenes de las cuales nunca ha sido puesto en libertad. La muestra contó con numerosos cambios de vestuario y un poco de material raunchiest del Condado. Ocho canciones de la serie fueron puestos en libertad en el CD de 2006, el condado de Wayne At The Trucks , en Munster Records. El espectáculo es reclamado por el condado de haber sido la inspiración para de Bowie Diamond Dogs gira. [ 1 ] En particular, el condado sostiene que la canción “Queenage Baby” era un prototipo para la canción de Bowie ” Rebel Rebel “, una afirmación que es apoyada por algunos críticos de rock. [ 2 ] [ 3 ]
    En 1974 formó “el condado de Wayne y los Backstreet Boys”, que grabó tres canciones para Max Kansas City: New York New Wave , una compilación que también contó con el suicidio , Pere Ubu , vainilla de la cereza y El Rápido . Condado de Wayne y Los Backstreet Boys jugaron regularmente en el CBGB y Max Kansas City , donde el condado era también un DJ. En 1976, ella apareció en la película The Blank Generación , dirigida por Amos Poe y Ivan Kral . La película, la grabación y los espectáculos eran los inicios de lo que llegó a ser conocido como el punk rock , y ayudaron a definir el movimiento.
    En 1977, el condado se trasladó a Londres, donde la escena punk Inglés estaba emergiendo, y formó el condado de Wayne y las sillas eléctricas . Condado lanzó el EP eléctrico Sillas de 1977 , además de un solo en registros ilegales . Esto fue seguido por “Fuck Off”, registrada como una sola para los Registros de Safari y apoyado con una gira europea. Mientras que en Londres, el condado se reunió Derek Jarman , quien la eligió como “Lizard Lounge” en la película de punk seminal, Jubileo , que también protagonizó Adam Ant , Toyah Willcox , Ian Charleson , Little Nell y Jordania . Condado y la banda también se ofrecen en el punk rock de la película , por Don Letts , que contiene parte de una actuación de 1977 en The Roxy Club en Londres.
    Poco después de esto, el condado de Wayne y The Electric Chairs grabaron su primer álbum homónimo, así como un EP , descaradamente ofensivo , que contenía “Fuck Off” y “WC Amor.” Después gira grabaron Tormenta las puertas del cielo . El siguiente álbum, lanzado en 1979, era cosas que su madre nunca te dijo , que contó con varias canciones basadas en las experiencias de Condado en Alemania y fue producido por David Cunningham . Después de su lanzamiento, la banda se separó y el condado, junto con el guitarrista Eliot Michaels, regresó a los EE.UU. Fue en este tiempo que ella cambió su nombre artístico de “Jayne County” y comenzó públicamente identificar como una mujer. La versión final por el Condado de Registros de Safari , Rock and Roll Resurrección (En Concierto) , estaba bajo este nuevo nombre.
    En 1983, el condado volvió a Nueva York, donde ella apareció en la producción teatral Les Girls con acebo Woodlawn . Poco después regresó a Londres para el estreno de la Ciudad de las almas perdidas y se quedó el tiempo suficiente para grabar y recorrer otro álbum, Oyster privada , con Warren Heighway como gerente. Su banda incluye miembros de varias bandas de rock basado Reino Unido, incluyendo Manchester guitarristas basados, Stu Clarke y Chris Lynch [Rockson], Mark Pearson en el bajo y Bazz Creece en la batería. A raíz de atención de los medios, ella regresó a los EE.UU.
    En la década de 1990 muchas de las grabaciones anteriores fueron puestos en libertad, incluyendo las primeras pistas de Safari, en un CD llamado Rock & Roll Cleopatra . Ella grabó el álbum Diosa De Wet Dreams en 1993, seguido de desviación , en 1995. Ese mismo año apareció en Wigstock: La película y lanzó su autobiografía, hombre bastante para ser una mujer .
    Desde entonces varias pistas nuevas han aparecido en varias compilaciones y por medio de la web oficial del Condado. Muchos de estos temas, tanto en directo como grabaciones de estudio, se recogieron sobre la liberación Ratcage Registros Así que Nueva York , incluyendo colaboraciones con Lisa Jackson y el ex Presidentes guitarrista eléctrico Eliot Michaels. Un espectáculo en vivo, grabado en el cumpleaños de Condado, fue lanzado en el CD 2002 Wash Me In The Blood (Of Rock & Roll) – Live at Squeeze Box por Colmillo Records, y cuenta con un dúo en “California Sun” por el Condado y el ex némesis ” Hermoso “Dick Manitoba de The Dictators .
     
     
     
     

     

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    Relacionado

  17. […] more recent example: if the writers of LGB(t) history had featured the trans women of color of Stonewall as pioneers, we could’ve begun our work on trans visibility 45 years ago. But the combination of […]

  18. […] Transgenders consistently lie about what happened at the Stonewall Inn in 1969. Their lie holds that the Stonewall riot was variously spurred by or chiefly carried out by transgenders, specifically “transwomen of colour” and even more specifically an “instigator” named Ray “Sylvia” Rivera. If you’d like all Stonewall-related transgender lies collected in one place, I would refer you to the so-called Transadvocate. […]

  19. […] how, not when someone else has already done it infinitely better than I ever could. Please click this link to read how the story of Stonewall has been stolen from the trans-community by cis-centric members […]

  20. […] does a story on the Stonewall Riot which erases the centrality of trans […]

  21. […] of ciswashing queer history – especially Stonewall history. I wrote about this phenomena over at TransAdvocate after NPR ran a piece recounting how middle-class white gay men were the real heroes of Stonewall. […]

  22. […] of ciswashing queer history – especially Stonewall history. I wrote about this phenomena over at TransAdvocate after NPR ran a piece recounting how middle-class white gay men were the real heroes of Stonewall. […]

  23. @jskylerinc says:

    RT @janetmock: @cristanwilliams thanks for breaking this down w/ historical context: “On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/zAXZ2w8y #trans” #girlslikeus

  24. RT @MassTPC: Finally! MT @TGTapestry: Cristan @ Transadvocate writes about some very widely varying versions of Stonewall Riots … http://t.co/kB5Yvmc5

  25. RT @transadvocate: On Cis-washing #Stonewall | http://t.co/e9XpJZ1p #trans #lgbt #mustread

  26. @janetmock says:

    @cristanwilliams thanks for breaking this down w/ historical context: “On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/zAXZ2w8y #trans” #girlslikeus

  27. @JaynaPonder says:

    RT @transadvocate: “So, what was Stonewall?” – @nprnews Ciswashing of queer history http://t.co/C0QtSdTE #trans #LGBT #stonewall #obama

  28. @KelestiMMO says:

    RT @notfurioso: An important article on Stonewall and the contributions of the transgender community to gay rights: http://t.co/XaF80CrZ

  29. @notfurioso says:

    An important article on Stonewall and the contributions of the transgender community to gay rights: http://t.co/XaF80CrZ

  30. @alleynoir says:

    And so began a long and painful tradition of the cisgender GLB community throwing trans folk under the bus … http://t.co/EtNsBMKw

  31. @Nyx2701 says:

    “So, what was Stonewall?” http://t.co/W4GGxLQf via transadvocate

  32. RT @sarahfelts: Wow. This is important to read. RT @transadvocate: @maddow On Cis-washing #Stonewall | http://t.co/zLUTECRx #trans #lgbt

  33. RT @sarahfelts: Wow. This is important to read. RT @transadvocate: @maddow On Cis-washing #Stonewall | http://t.co/zLUTECRx #trans #lgbt

  34. RT @sarahfelts: Wow. This is important to read. RT @transadvocate: @maddow On Cis-washing #Stonewall | http://t.co/zLUTECRx #trans #lgbt

  35. @rynthetyn says:

    RT @transadvocate: “So, what was Stonewall?” – @nprnews Ciswashing of queer history http://t.co/C0QtSdTE #trans #LGBT #stonewall #obama

  36. @Falcc says:

    RT @transadvocate: “So, what was Stonewall?” – @nprnews Ciswashing of queer history http://t.co/C0QtSdTE #trans #LGBT #stonewall #obama

  37. @torkna says:

    RT @GetEQUAL: GREAT piece! RT ‏@cristanwilliams
    @GetEQUAL On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/JELjFinz #trans #lgbt

  38. @Loba says:

    RT @Lavernecox: Must read article in the wake of #Obama’s mention of #Stonewall in his #Inaugural address http://t.co/yi0u97Td #girlslikeus

  39. @charolem says:

    RT @katebornstein: Wow. Hv u sent this to @nprnews et al as letter to editor? RT @cristanwilliams: On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/rqZr3rsq #trans

  40. Excellent counter post to Stonewall revisionism in #TransAdvocate http://t.co/9cEJOnVZ

  41. RT @TransEnough: “So, what was Stonewall?” http://t.co/1S9VkFUO

  42. @Charbroyled says:

    RT @katebornstein: Wow. Hv u sent this to @nprnews et al as letter to editor? RT @cristanwilliams: On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/rqZr3rsq #trans

  43. RT @gwenners: Beautifully done. RT @cristanwilliams: On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/berESEpn #trans #lgbt

  44. @catvalente says:

    RT @Lavernecox: Must read article in the wake of #Obama’s mention of #Stonewall in his #Inaugural address http://t.co/yi0u97Td #girlslikeus

  45. @Gavriil42 says:

    RT @katebornstein: Wow. Hv u sent this to @nprnews et al as letter to editor? RT @cristanwilliams: On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/rqZr3rsq #trans

  46. @Miko100 says:

    RT @katebornstein: Wow. Hv u sent this to @nprnews et al as letter to editor? RT @cristanwilliams: On Ciswashing #Stonewall | http://t.co/rqZr3rsq #trans

  47. RT @Lavernecox: Must read article in the wake of #Obama’s mention of #Stonewall in his #Inaugural address http://t.co/yi0u97Td #girlslikeus

  48. RT @MassTPC: Finally! MT @TGTapestry: Cristan @ Transadvocate writes about some very widely varying versions of Stonewall Riots … http://t.co/kB5Yvmc5

  49. @MassTPC says:

    Finally! MT @TGTapestry: Cristan @ Transadvocate writes about some very widely varying versions of Stonewall Riots … http://t.co/kB5Yvmc5

  50. @drcompton says:

    “So, what was Stonewall?” http://t.co/AjpEsoXX via @zite

  51. @Barbeydahl says:

    Remember your history… CORRECTLY. http://t.co/oNXcX06a

  52. @transmarch says:

    RT @JustBiyuti: Also? WHITE WASHING RT @transadvocate: “So, what was Stonewall?” – @nprnews Ciswashing of queer history http://t.co/9AuImxk6

  53. @Adamdm_ says:

    Did you know that the Stonewall riots mentioned by Obama in his inauguration speech involved trans people? http://t.co/fL85ui5c

  54. RT @ATLTransHealth: RT @transadvocate: “So, what was Stonewall?” – @nprnews Ciswashing of queer history http://t.co/d6U8K9qb #trans #LGBT #cc13 #tpoc

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