Déjà Vu All Over Again!?! Do We Hafta???
September 27, 2007
Are We Ready For Prime Time?
January 18, 2008

ENDA Three Card Draw

lgbcardWith passage of The Matthew Shepard Act in the Senate on Thursday, it should have been a time for celebration. But on the heels of the victory came the news that gender identity could possibly be stripped of from the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. The Advocate confirmed the story tonight saying:

“The Democratic House leadership is considering stripping protections for transgender people from ENDA after a preliminary vote count found the measure would not pass if it had trans-inclusive language. ‘The fact of the matter is, we’ve been canvassing this — the votes just are not there for a trans-inclusive bill,’ said Steven Adamske, spokesman for Rep. Barney Frank, sponsor of the original bill. Reps. Frank and Tammy Baldwin, the only openly gay members of Congress, called for the count after they learned House speaker Nancy Pelosi feared the measure lacked enough support to pass.”

Matt Foreman took the bold step this morning by posting to Bilerico.com “A non-transgender-inclusive ENDA? No way!” Around the same time, a statement was put out by the Executive Directors of nine national LGBT organizations saying:

Our collective position remains clear and consistent regarding the status of the Employment Nondiscrimination Act. Our organizations oppose the removal of protections for transgender people from ENDA. We would also oppose any bill that did not protect transgender people. We are shocked and upset that, according to the Washington Blade, influential members of the House of Representatives have apparently made a decision to remove protections for transgender people from the bill. If true, this decision was made without consultation with leaders of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

While we don’t doubt the sincerity of Congressional leadership’s intent to take action and be helpful to the LGBT community, we cannot disagree more with this strategy. We will continue to work with LGBT supportive members of Congress to urge their colleagues to immediately drop this strategy.

Jody Huckaby, Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays
Matt Foreman, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, Inc.
Mara Keisling, National Center for Transgender Equality
Kate Kendell, National Center for Lesbian Rights
Jon Hoadley, National Stonewall Democrats
Rebecca Fox, National Coalition for LGBT Health
Jeremy Bishop, Pride At Work, AFL-CIO
Clarence Patton, National Coalition of Anti-Violence Projects
Andrea Densham, Mautner Project

The Empire State Pride Agenda, Equality Texas, and Garden State Equality have signed on as well. Noticeably missing for the list was the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) .

Speaking to the Advocate HRC spokesman Brad Luna said:

“The indication we are getting from the Hill is that the leadership will possibly move forward with a new version of ENDA that does not offer explicit protections for gender identity,” Luna said. “HRC is deeply disappointed and did not assent to this position.”

Great HRC, you’re disappointed! Why not sign on to the list of organizations that are saying “We would also oppose any bill that did not protect transgender people”? For an organization that puts out press releases at the drop of a hat, the lack of any kind of formal statement from HRC says quite a bit.

I really have to hand it to the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF). They are the unsung heroes in all this. In August of 2004 Foreman said :

“For many years, our community has debated the place of transgender people in the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA). The time for debate is over. The question must be called. ENDA must be amended to protect transgender people. If it is not, we all must walk away from it.”

It didn’t take a protest outside the offices of NGLTF to get that concession either. I would remind Joe Solmonese that it was his predecessor, Cheryl Jacques, that said:

“passing ENDA without gender identity and expression is like passing a copyright law that covers books and television shows but doesn’t cover digital music or videos. But ENDA is about people’s lives, not MP3s or DVDs. That’s why it’s so important that we have the strongest and most comprehensive bill possible.”

tchip1

Am I a poker chip or a member of the GLBT community?” If I’m not a poker chip, why hasn’t HRC come out publicly and taken the strong stance that NGLTF and many other equality groups have? The silence is deafening.

  • As someone who transitioned over two decades ago, I don’t have much to fear with respect to being called out on gender identity. I have much more to fear due to my identity as a lesbian in a 17 year relationship. Yet I am unwilling to use my privilege as an apparently cisgender person to grab for protection as a Lesbian while leaving behind my less privileged brothers and sisters.

    It is morally wrong for me to abandon my brothers and sisters. In the parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus tells of two respectable leaders who chose not to help a man who was robbed, beaten, stripped naked, and left for dead. They knew they were at risk of becoming ritually unclean, requiring them to turn back to Jerusalem – a costly delay.

    Yet a Samaritan – who didn’t even get along with the Jews – was so moved by the man’s situation that he stopped to help and even paid to have the man stay at an inn and recover.

    We have the opportunity to stop and help – even if it causes us delay – or to walk on with the hope that the man will not suffer too much waiting for us to come back

    If it is more difficult to pass ENDA with transgender language included, what does that tell you? It tells me that more people are willing to accept discrimination against transgender people and, therefore, transgender people need this law even more than gay and Lesbian people do.

    Waiting until people don’t want to discriminate before passing an anti-discrimination law makes no sense.

    Waiting until people don’t want to discriminate against a class of people before passing an anti-discrimination law to protect that class makes no sense.

    I’m siding with the Samaritans on this. Walk on by at your own risk.

  • As someone who transitioned over two decades ago, I don’t have much to fear with respect to being called out on gender identity. I have much more to fear due to my identity as a lesbian in a 17 year relationship. Yet I am unwilling to use my privilege as an apparently cisgender person to grab for protection as a Lesbian while leaving behind my less privileged brothers and sisters.

    It is morally wrong for me to abandon my brothers and sisters. In the parable of the Good Samaritan, Jesus tells of two respectable leaders who chose not to help a man who was robbed, beaten, stripped naked, and left for dead. They knew they were at risk of becoming ritually unclean, requiring them to turn back to Jerusalem – a costly delay.

    Yet a Samaritan – who didn’t even get along with the Jews – was so moved by the man’s situation that he stopped to help and even paid to have the man stay at an inn and recover.

    We have the opportunity to stop and help – even if it causes us delay – or to walk on with the hope that the man will not suffer too much waiting for us to come back

    If it is more difficult to pass ENDA with transgender language included, what does that tell you? It tells me that more people are willing to accept discrimination against transgender people and, therefore, transgender people need this law even more than gay and Lesbian people do.

    Waiting until people don’t want to discriminate before passing an anti-discrimination law makes no sense.

    Waiting until people don’t want to discriminate against a class of people before passing an anti-discrimination law to protect that class makes no sense.

    I’m siding with the Samaritans on this. Walk on by at your own risk.

  • naedlrega

    My rep is actually Tammy Baldwin, one of the co-sponsors who called for a head count. I’m going to see whether any of her staffers said anything as horrible as what Frank’s did– whether she did anything worse than call for the head count.

    She’s going to get a phone call from me today. The question at this point is how angry that call will be.

    –something to be

  • naedlrega

    My rep is actually Tammy Baldwin, one of the co-sponsors who called for a head count. I’m going to see whether any of her staffers said anything as horrible as what Frank’s did– whether she did anything worse than call for the head count.

    She’s going to get a phone call from me today. The question at this point is how angry that call will be.

    –something to be

  • Mila

    I just wrote my Congressman, everyone else should do the same.

    Mila

  • Mila

    I just wrote my Congressman, everyone else should do the same.

    Mila